sexual selection

(redirected from Male-male competition)
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Related to Male-male competition: Female Choice

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

a form of natural selection in which, according to darwinian theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, form, color, behavior, etc., in the opposite sex; thus modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

(sek'shū-ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
A form of natural selection in which, according to Darwin's theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, forms, colors, behaviors, and phenomena, in the opposite sex; thus, modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

the selection of a mate by female animals where, for example, the most brightly coloured is favoured, so maintaining brightly coloured males in a population. Some authorities consider that sexual selection explains the existence of SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This suggested that female choice may play a more important role than male-male competition during breeding of this species.
The level of activity of the males has been shown to be the only predictor of spawning success in Lucania goodei (McGhee et al., 2007), suggesting that the activity of the males and male-male competition are important components of sexual selection in these types of breeding systems.
In other dimorphic beetles minor males avoid male-male competition by either mating earlier in the activity cycle or adopting satellite mating tactics (Eberhard 1982, Siva-Jothy 1987, Goldsmith 1987).
Two mechanisms which contribute to the process of sexual selection are male-male competition and female choice.
"He imagines that females are choosing the males who are the winners at male-male competition."
Martin and Bergmann (1996) argued that male-male competition may be occurring in situations where "...
When Darwin (1871) suggested that sexual selection comprised intrasexual selection (usually mediated by male-male competition) and intersexual selection (usually via female choice), he considered only the behavioral processes taking place prior to copulation.
But hierarchizing forces were at work contemporaneously; the overpopulation observed by David Herlihy intensified male-male competition, contributing to the rise of the patrilines noted by Herlihy, Christiane Klapisch-Zuber and Diane Owen Hughes.
Andersson likens contest or male-male competition to interference competition and mate choice to exploitative competition.
Aggression among male Tibetan macaques is more intense due to increased male-male competition for success to resources (i.e., females) (Li, 1999).
The influence of male mating history on male-male competition and female choice in mating associations in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun).