butterfly rash

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rash

 [rash]
a temporary eruption on the skin.
butterfly rash a skin eruption across the nose and adjacent areas of the cheeks in the pattern of a butterfly, as in lupus erythematosus and seborrheic dermatitis. (See Atlas 2, Part B).
diaper rash irritant dermatitis in the area in contact with the diaper in infants, often sparing the genitocrural folds, occurring as a reaction to prolonged contact with urine and feces, retained soaps and topical preparations, and friction and maceration, and commonly associated with secondary bacterial and yeast infections, especially with Candida albicans. Some consider irritation by the ammoniac decomposition products of urine to be a contributing factor. Called also diaper dermatitis.
drug rash drug eruption.
heat rash miliaria.

but·ter·fly

(bŭt'er-flī),
1. Any structure or apparatus shaped like a butterfly with outstretched wings.
2. A scaling erythematous lesion on each cheek, joined by a narrow band across the nose; seen in lupus erythematosus and seborrheic dermatitis. Synonym(s): butterfly eruption, butterfly patch, butterfly rash

butterfly rash

(bŭt′ər-flī′)
n.
A lesion on each cheek and across the bridge of the nose, seen in systemic lupus erythematosus and seborrheic dermatitis.
An often photosensitive facial rash typical of systemic lupus erythematosus, which consists of an erythematous blush or scaly reddish patches on the malar region, extending over the nasal bridge—the facial ‘seborrhoeic’ region—potentially becoming bullous and/or secondarily infected
DiffDx, butterfly region rashes AIDS, ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dermatomyositis, erysipelas, pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus erythematosus, riboflavin deficiency, tuberous sclerosis with smooth, red-yellow papules—adenoma sebaceum—appearing by age 4 at the nasolabial fold

butterfly rash

Internal medicine An often photosensitive facial rash typical of SLE, which consists of an erythematous blush or scaly reddish patches on the malar region, extending over the nasal bridge–the facial 'seborrheic' region, potentially becoming bullous and/or secondarily infected; 'butterfly' region rashes have been described in AIDS, ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dermatomyositis, erysipelas, pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus erythematosus, riboflavin deficiency, tuberous sclerosis with smooth, red-yellow papules–adenoma sebaceum, appearing by age 4 at the nasolabial fold. See Systemic lupus erythematosus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mucocutaneous findings, such as malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, and Raynaud's phenomenon, are more common in ASLE in Latin America, only malar rash is more common in JSLE and ASLE than in LSLE in Brazil, and only oral ulcers are more common in JSLE and ASLE in Korea [17, 19, 21].
In this study, patients with SLE non-specific skin manifestations, especially maculopapular rashes, vasculitic rashes, and scarring alopecia were associated with more active disease in lieu of clinical history and lab investigations and malar rash was associated with internal organ involvement.
LN is unlikely to present alone--it often manifests with other extrarenal features such as joint pain, malar rash, oral ulcers and photosensitivity.
According to ACR criteria, 60% of patients had ever experienced malar rash; 17% had experienced discoid rash; 56%, photosensitivity; and 56%, ulcerations.
The malar rash of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) consistently spares the nasolabial folds, for reasons unknown.
These were pericarditis, malar rash, polyarthritis, and a positive mixing test experiment indicating presence of a lupus anticoagulant (anti-phospholipid antibody subtype), a positive LE cell test and persistent lymphopenic leukopenia (1.29 - 1.30x[10.sup.9]/l).
Malar rash and photosensitivity were the mucocutaneous manifestations seen more often in the white patients, compared with the nonwhite patients (occurring in 86% vs.
Initially, he presented malar rash, arthritis, alopecia, non-painful oral ulcers, headaches, fever, anorexia, weight loss (28 lbs.
A malar rash that travels down the nasolabial folds is one common clinical manifestation.
* Malar rash (a butterfly-shaped rash of the cheeks and across the bridge of the nose)
Criteria for Diagnosing SLE * Malar rash * Discoid lupus * Photosensitivity * Oral ulcers * Arthritis * Pleuritis or pericarditis * Renal disorder * Seizures or psychosis * Hematologic dysfunction (i.e., Leukopenia, Hemolytic anemia, Thrombocytopenia) * Anti-DNA or Anti-SM antibodies, LE cells, of False-Positive Serologic Test for Syphillis * Positive antinuclear antibodies In 1982, the American Rheumatism Association published revised criteria for the diagnosis of SLE.
She gave a history of alopecia, fever, fatigue, malar rash, and oral ulcers for the last nine years.