Friend

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Friend

(frend),
Charlotte, U.S. microbiologist, 1921-1987. See: Friend disease, Friend virus, Friend leukemia virus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Delevingne was (https://www.latintimes.com/cara-delevingnes-girlfriend-st-vincent-waitressed-dallas-taqueria-photos-346534?utm_source=Cengage&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Partnerships) really cautious about making friends in the industry.
She makes light of being around famous people like Shakespeare and the queen, and her curiosity and openness to making friends are easy to relate to.
'I am so so glad that Ellie has been adjusting well on the island and is making friends. But having friends = having plans of her own,' she said.
While cultural diplomacy can sound daunting, culture and art are powerful tools for making friends across the world, reported the Central News Agency (CNA).
It was decided the magazine would focus on the transition from primary school to secondary, and the worries that new pupils will have about making friends.
But then Making Friends As The World Ends 2 is no ordinary film.
Since his youth,Tolkien (Nicholas Hoult) has always found it difficult making friends. Orphaned as a child, he's never known a normal life.
Sharing the joy Making friends and sharing the moment
Fans of all ages are going to love making friends with this adorable addition to the Pokemon lineup.
(https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1037063/the-queen-prince-charles-buckingham-palace-reign-royal-news) Prince Charles previously opened up about his struggles with making friends during an interview with Mary Riddell in 2001.
Activist Xhabir Deralla in Sloboden pecat concludes that this Macedonia could have shown much better the nice face of politics and this process of making friends with neighboring nations, with the world and with a better future, to be nicer, more cheerful and dignified ...
Build confidence Say: 'It's going to be great!' rather than 'Are you nervous?' Settling in is a lot about selfesteem so telling them how great they are - at maths or sport or making friends or being kind - will go a long way.