biome

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biome

 [bi´ōm]
a large, distinct, easily differentiated community of organisms arising as a result of complex interactions of climatic factors, flora, fauna, and substrate; usually designated according to kind of vegetation present, such as tundra, coniferous forest, deciduous forest, or grassland.

bi·ome

(bī'ōm),
The total complex of biotic communities occupying and characterizing a particular geographic area or zone.
[bio- + -ome]

biome

(bī′ōm′)
n.
A major regional or global biotic community, such as a grassland or desert, characterized chiefly by the dominant forms of plant life and the prevailing climate.

biome

[bī′ōm]
Etymology: Gk, bios + oma, tumor, mass
the collection of biological communities existing in and characteristic of a broad geographic region, such as desert, tropical forest, or savanna. A biome includes all organisms of a particular region.

biome

An ecosystem with a distinct climate, organisms and substrates, all of which interact to produce a distinct and complex biotic community.

bi·ome

(bī'ōm)
The total complex of biotic communities occupying and characterizing a particular geographic area or zone.

biome

a major regional ecological community of organisms usually defined by the botanical habitat in which they occur and determined by the interaction of the substrate, climate, fauna and flora. The term is often limited to denote terrestrial habitats, e.g. tundra, coniferous forest, grassland. Oceans may be considered as a single biome (the marine biome), though sometimes this is subdivided, e.g. coral reef biome. There is no sharp distinction between adjacent biomes.

biome

a large, distinct, easily differentiated community of organisms in a major ecological region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Four major habitat types were classified from pre-impoundment aerial photographs: forest parkland, riparian woodland, scrub/shrub and old field.
The proponents claimed that the GOMIOW would serve three principal functions: (1) preserving marine diversity; (2) preserving large areas of the five major habitat types in the Gulf of Maine; and (3) providing control areas for future benthic ecological study.
The GOMIOW would close portions of the five major habitat types found in the Gulf of Maine, essentially creating control sites for future habitat research.

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