major depressive episode

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episode

 [ep´ĭ-sōd]
a single noteworthy happening in the course of a longer series of events, such as one critical period of several during a prolonged illness.
hypomanic episode a period of elevated, expansive, or irritable mood similar to a manic episode but not as severe; see also bipolar disorders and mood disorders.
major depressive episode a period of daily and day-long depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in virtually all activities. Also present is some combination of altered appetite, weight, or sleep patterns, psychomotor agitation or retardation, difficulty thinking or concentrating, lack of energy and fatigue, feelings of worthlessness, self-reproach, or inappropriate guilt, recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, and plans or attempts to commit suicide. See also bipolar disorders and mood disorders.
manic episode a period of predominantly elevated, expansive, or irritable mood accompanied by some of the following symptoms: inflated self-esteem, decreased need for sleep, talkativeness, flight of ideas, distractibility, hyperactivity, hypersexuality, and recklessness. See also bipolar disorders and mood disorders.
mixed episode a period during which the criteria are met both for a major depressive episode and for a manic episode nearly every day, with rapidly alternating moods and with symptoms characteristic of each type of episode. See also bipolar disorders and mood disorders.

major depressive episode

A condition defined as a period of at least two weeks, during which there is either depressed mood or the loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities and in which the patient experiences at least four additional symptoms, including: changes in appetitite or weight, sleep, and psychomotor activity; decreased energy; feelings of worthlessness or guilt; difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions; or recurrent thoughts of death, or suicidal ideation, plans or attempts.

major depressive episode

Psychiatry A condition defined as '…a period of at least 2 wks, during which there is either depressed mood or the loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities…(and) …experience at least 4 additional symptoms (including) … changes in appetitite or weight, sleep, and psychomotor activity; decreased energy; feelings of worthlessness or guilt; difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions; or recurrent thoughts of death, or suicidal ideation, plans, or attempts.'. See Major depression.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings from this expert review panel demonstrate that women in the perimenopausal transition are at increased risk for depressive symptoms, major depressive episodes, and major depressive disorder.
Seasonal variation in major depressive episode prevalence in Canada.
[40,41] There is also increasing evidence that some who experience a major depressive episode will have a lifelong course of illness characterised by recurrent major depressive episodes or the development of chronicity, e.g.
(22) The prevalence of major depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder with current major depressive episode was 6%, while both adjustment disorder with depressed mood and dysthymic disorder was 6%.
The survey found that while 8% of adolescents aged 12-17 years had experienced at least one major depressive episode in the past year, only 39% of those adolescents had received treatment.
Engineering, architecture, and surveying were the occupations with the lowest rates of depression (4.3 percent) last year, while workers in personal care and service jobs (10.8 percent) and food preparation and serving occupations (10.3 percent) were most likely to experience a major depressive episode, according to a report by the U.S.
However, in contrast with community samples, CES-D scores predicted accurately major depressive episodes and other mental disorders such as anxiety and substance abuse disorders in a sample of primary medical care patients (31).
Most PCPs are familiar with the criteria for a major depressive episode and recognize its symptoms.
The essential feature of major depressive disorder is a clinical course that is characterized by one or more major depressive episodes without a history of other mood disorders, such as bipolar depression, substance-induced mood disorder, or organic mood disorder (APA, 2000a).
In general, history of major depressive episodes is important to predict future episodes, because some patients with depression have patterns of recurrence.
A consultant psychiatrist said she was experiencing "major depressive episodes".
But at the same time, there is no denying that "Lincoln had major depressive episodes." Lincoln himself frequently described his own "misery," especially during the perfect mental storm he suffered in the early 1840s from the collapse of his first political career and his multiple romantic disappointments.

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