science

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sci·ence

(sī'ents),
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]

science

(sī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena: new advances in science and technology.
b. Such activities restricted to a class of natural phenomena: the science of astronomy.
2. A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area: the science of marketing.

science

Vox populi The formal and systematic study of natural phenomena. See Big science, Fraud in science, Little science, Junk science, Misconduct in science, Prediction science, Pseudoscience.

sci·ence

(sī'ĕns)
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]
References in periodicals archive ?
This book is recommended for those looking for resources in public science policy and for information on public personalities involved in denying mainstream science, in particular the issue of global warming.
While he still attempted to uphold central assumptions of mainstream science that there is a simple order accessible through the 'scientific method' underlying the diversity of appearances in nature, he moved away from his earlier reductionism, offering some support for Stuart Kauffman's efforts to develop a notion of life as self-organising through complexity theory, grappling with the question of mind and its relation to the body and arguing that that genes and culture co-evolve in the evolution of humanity.
A steady increase in the supply of mainstream science and technology graduates e.g.
The resistance from mainstream science, which is committed to a materialistic world view, is easier to understand and to justify than is the resistance from experimental psi research.
The bottom line is that current mainstream science does, in fact, raise very serious theological questions that the church, and not merely Collins and Giberson, must wrestle through.
'As a teenager I used to read a lot of science fiction like Isaac Asimov and Arthur C Clarke and often with scientists science fiction gets them into mainstream science.
Considering that similar phenomena are also found in other parts of the world would indicate the existence of some universal principle or law governing them, which may be unknown to mainstream science.
Their theoretical argument is that there is no "mechanistic theory" of precognition, by which they mean mechanisms sanctioned by mainstream science. Their two examples are brain processes and evolution.
Loud voices on all sides proclaim that a complementary relationship is an illusion or requires a radical change in either mainstream science or in our understanding of the Bible.
Parapsychology, or whatever it is called, is important because it is the only science that dares to probe or investigate phenomena that mainstream science refuses to look into.
Further, Fuller suggests that the current anti-ID animus parallels the anti-communist McCarthyism of the Cold War era; that Darwin's natural selection should itself be understood as a design-based mechanism; and that in the long run the use of computer simulations will bring ID and mainstream science closer together (e.g., William Dembski's notion of specified complexity overlaps with Stuart Kauffman's quest for identifying self-organizing complexity surviving at the edge of chaos).
There are four means by which parapsychologists hope to eventually convince the larger scientific community that psi exists: well controlled and rigorously obtained empirical observations; theoretical constructs that both account for the data of psi and are consistent with mainstream science; demonstrated practical applications; and, finally, protocols leading to direct, personal experience.