mainframe computer

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Related to Mainframe computers: Supercomputers, Mini computers

mainframe computer

Informatics
A large computer that manipulates large blocks of data by “multitasking” logical sequences. Such data manipulation in hospital computers is now largely carried by networked PCs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the mainframe computer sector was increasingly a kind of rump of those who had been left behind.
The department's mainframe computer connects approximately 1,000 computers and 500 video terminals.
Maintaining mainframe computers accounts for $17.4 billion, or more than 60 percent of funds budgeted for bank technology.
Hayes increased the value of its 33.6Kbps PC Card modems by adding remote configuration, access control and dial-back security, and Hayes AutoSync II, which allows high-speed, synchronous connection to mini and mainframe computers without additional hardware.
Various questions were asked concerning availability of microcomputers versus mainframe computers, sources of computer learning, and selected demographics.
Reporting systems, for example, currently reside on plant-level mainframe computers that store product reports known as "history cards." These reports list important parameters, setpoints and run lengths for each job.
Waiting lists exist in hospital mainframe computers and on surgeon's ledgers, but these data are rarely gathered and studied.
UNIX: UNIX is an operating system from AT&T that can support multiple users (see Network), multiple programs simultaneously "multitasking"), and a wide variety of computer systems from microcomputers to large mainframe computers.
He points out that in large companies particularly, mainframe computers link various facilities with a wealth of informa| tion.
(BITNET is a network linking the mainframe computers of many of the world's university computer systems.) The following was taken from Handicap Digest #1.
The major challenges include demonstrating the utility and security of the data management scheme to physicians, achieving cooperation from them to contribute their medical databases (even diagnoses related to claims will do at the outset), and setting up the programming that is required to allow a generic software system to be loaded into computer memory (RAM) and run with the data stored in mainframe computers. [6]
In the early 1960s, Tax Executives Institute (TEI) became involved in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) computer training programs at Georgia Institute of Technology, where the IRS undertook to train its staff to work with and use mainframe computers. By 1968 the IRS had "Auditape," a program to extract specific information from the mainframe files of a taxpayer.