Maillard reaction


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Maillard reaction

A non-enzymatic heat-activated chemical reaction between sugars (especially ribose) and amino acids, which occurs in foods as they form glycosylamines and Amadori compounds. The Maillard reaction is responsible for “browning” of baked or cooked foods (e.g., bread crusts and barbecued steak), which are mutagenic by the Ames assay.

It is possible that the age-related changes in collagen are partially mediated through the Maillard reaction; it has been suggested that a similar, if not identical, reaction is involved in certain neurodegenerative diseases—e.g., Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Parkinson’s diseases.

Maillard reaction

A chemical reaction between sugars and proteins that results in cellular damage or aging; the making of advanced glycosylation end products; the chemical deterioration of proteins during food processing or storage. Also known in nutritional science as the “browning reaction.”
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They found that encapsulation can prevent the formation of potentially harmful compounds, such as undesired Maillard reaction products, in thermally processed foods.
Complementary to this, other researcher propounded that factors that significantly affect the rate of the Maillard reaction were the pH, amino compounds and reducing sugar content [23].
Oberparleiter and Ziegleder [9] confirmed these findings by Hashim and Chaveron [7] and Cros and Jeanjean [8] by identifying Amadori compounds, the first intermediates of Maillard reaction in dried, unroasted cocoa beans.
Another factor of baking or toasting cereals such as wheat, oats or corn is what scientists have concluded is called the Maillard Reaction.
The Maillard reaction comprises a series of reactions between the amino compounds, usually the amino acids or proteins, and carbohydrates.
This may also be attributed to the Maillard reaction between sugar and proteins contributing to the increased chemical modification and cross-linking of long lived tissue proteins in diabetes (Fu et al.
KEY WORDS: Glycation, Diabetes, Maillard reaction, Sulfosalicyclic acid, TBA, Periodate.
Although the aim of cooking foods is to make them more appetising and microbiologically safe, it is now thought that cooking and food processing at high temperatures generate various kinds of toxic substances, such as heterocyclic: amines and acrylamide, through the Maillard reaction.
Previous studies suggested that antioxidants in coffee could be traced to caffeine or the chlorogenic acid found in green coffee beans, but our results clearly show that the Maillard reaction is the main source of antioxidants," Liu, an MSc student in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems (LFS) said.
Maillard reaction occurs between amino group of amino acid and carbonyl group of reducing sugar in food materials during cooking at high temperature [3].