Maillard reaction


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Maillard reaction

A non-enzymatic heat-activated chemical reaction between sugars (especially ribose) and amino acids, which occurs in foods as they form glycosylamines and Amadori compounds. The Maillard reaction is responsible for “browning” of baked or cooked foods (e.g., bread crusts and barbecued steak), which are mutagenic by the Ames assay.

It is possible that the age-related changes in collagen are partially mediated through the Maillard reaction; it has been suggested that a similar, if not identical, reaction is involved in certain neurodegenerative diseases—e.g., Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Parkinson’s diseases.

Maillard reaction

A chemical reaction between sugars and proteins that results in cellular damage or aging; the making of advanced glycosylation end products; the chemical deterioration of proteins during food processing or storage. Also known in nutritional science as the “browning reaction.”
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The Maillard reaction and oxidative stress during ageing of soybean seeds.
According to Acar and colleagues, roasting nuts may destroy some bioactive compounds, but it can also form antioxidant compounds through the Maillard reaction. However, the total antioxidants capacity after roasting is the result of the thermal degradation of naturally occurring antioxidant compounds and the formation of new Maillard reaction products having antioxidant activity.
The other main route to the formation of HMF is the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction plays an important role in the taste and appearance of food and occurs during cooking.
They found that encapsulation can prevent the formation of potentially harmful compounds, such as undesired Maillard reaction products, in thermally processed foods.
This research is based on two principles: (i) the chymotrypsin hydrolysis of gelatin from a different source could produce peptides of varying properties that will yield a different degree of browning during Maillard reaction and (ii) the introduction of [Cu.sup.2+] will expedite the rate of reaction and reduce the time for brown colour development.
A series of reactions take place during heat treatment between amino groups of proteins and aldehyde groups of lactose known Maillard reaction. This reaction is much faster at temperatures above 100degC, which results in a change in color and flavor as well as loss in essential amino acids (lysine & arginine) (Manji & Kakuda, 1988; Alfa- Laval, 2003).
She describes this reaction as the Maillard reaction, a chemical reaction between an amino acid and a reducing sugar which often requires heat.
The complex, fluorescent AGE molecules formed during the Maillard reaction can lead to protein cross-linking and contribute to the development and progression of several diabetic complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cataracts, impaired wound healing, vascular damage, arterial wall stiffening and decreased myocardial compliance (Wautier and Guillausseau, 2001; Aronson, 2003; Ahmed, 2005; Thomas et al., 2005; Wada and Yagihashi, 2005).
Developed using innovative Maillard reaction technology, Savorkey ingredients are strictly vegan and represent a cost-effective alternative to traditional animal protein-based taste.