Maillard reaction

(redirected from Maillard browning)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Maillard reaction

A non-enzymatic heat-activated chemical reaction between sugars (especially ribose) and amino acids, which occurs in foods as they form glycosylamines and Amadori compounds. The Maillard reaction is responsible for “browning” of baked or cooked foods (e.g., bread crusts and barbecued steak), which are mutagenic by the Ames assay.

It is possible that the age-related changes in collagen are partially mediated through the Maillard reaction; it has been suggested that a similar, if not identical, reaction is involved in certain neurodegenerative diseases—e.g., Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Parkinson’s diseases.

Maillard reaction

A chemical reaction between sugars and proteins that results in cellular damage or aging; the making of advanced glycosylation end products; the chemical deterioration of proteins during food processing or storage. Also known in nutritional science as the “browning reaction.”
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Another way to take advantage of the Maillard browning effect in making stew is by coating the meat with a bit of flour before browning.
Additional evidence of the absence of free sugar monomers is the lack of Maillard browning (virtually eliminating acrylamide formation) in potatoes that were Lintonized[TM] prior to frying.
The extent of Maillard browning can be managed with appropriate sweeteners and pH.
Polyols do not have a reactive carbonyl group and thus do not contribute to Maillard browning.
It is a non-reducing sugar, resistant to hydrolysis, and is not involved in the Maillard browning reaction.