Magnus force


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Magnus force

the force due to the interaction between the surface of a rotating object or body and the fluid medium (e.g. air or water) in which it is rotating. The force acts at right angles to the axis of rotation and, if the object is translating, to the path of the object. Also sometimes classified as a lift force. Examples are topspin causing downward motion of a ball (e.g. tennis) and sidespin causing sideways motion of a golf ball. (Named after the German physicist who described it in the mid-19th century.)
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Thus, in the case of the bubble motion the Magnus force is determined from empirical relationships [6, 8].
It is a result of big turbulences of the liquid while dividing near the bubble, the Magnus force is generated and its direction changes very fast.
7] Measuring the Magnus Force Generated by a Spinning Tennis Ball.
It is this phenomenon coupled with the almost constant spinning Magnus force that produces the exciting sudden dips and sideways motions of the best free kicks as the ball approaches the goal.
The Magnus force - named after H G Magnus, a German physicist who first investigated its properties about 150 years ago - is directly responsible for curling the ball off its normal path.
According to Mr Matthews, the real skill comes in controlling the third force, aerodynamic drag, which changes with the speed of the ball but which can also affect the Magnus Force.