magnitude

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mag·ni·tude

(mag'ni-tūd),
Size or extent.
References in classic literature ?
This stately tree, which is rarely met with upon the Sandwich Islands, and then only of a very inferior quality, and at Tahiti does not abound to a degree that renders its fruit the principal article of food, attains its greatest excellence in the genial climate of the Marquesan group, where it grows to an enormous magnitude, and flourishes in the utmost abundance.
The deeper we delve in search of these causes the more of them we find; and each separate cause or whole series of causes appears to us equally valid in itself and equally false by its insignificance compared to the magnitude of the events, and by its impotence- apart from the cooperation of all the other coincident causes- to occasion the event.
org; most of the visual magnitudes and sizes listed for these objects are estimates.
He categorized the stars into six magnitudes with the brightest stars assigned to the first magnitude and the faintest to the sixth magnitude.
The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th edition, 2001) now has a section on "Effect Size and Strength of Relationship" and identifies 15 ways to express magnitudes, although I do not approve of some of these.
Hanks believes the old model predicted too many quakes in the magnitude-6 to 7 range, because it predicted too few large quakes of magnitudes 7.
As magnitudes get smaller, however, the details of the seismic trace start to get washed out-unless sensors are located nearby, something not possible with a global network of only 170 stations.
It's also exactly 5 magnitudes (or 100 times) brighter than Saturn, at magnitude +0.
In 1935, Richter dressed up the Japanese method to create an earthquake index -- a simple numerical scale much like the stellar magnitudes used by his astronomical colleagues at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
REDI SAN Links Replicator's ability to copy data remotely at a rate of over 1GB/min, coupled with Finisar's FLX-2000 Optical Link Extender, which has a transfer rate of 1Gb/sec, make it possible to efficiently copy large amounts of data between remote MAGNITUDEs in a very short amount of time.
2 shock that struck the southern section of the nation on May 20 and was followed four days later by aftershocks with magnitudes of 7.