domain

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do·main

(dō-mān'),
1. Homologous unit of approximately 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

/do·main/ (do-mān´) in immunology, any of the homology regions of heavy or light polypeptide chains of immunoglobulins.

domain

(dō-mān′)
n.
Biology Any of three primary divisions of organisms, consisting of the eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea, that rank above a kingdom in taxonomic systems based on similarities of DNA sequences.

domain

a region of a protein or polypeptide whose three-dimensional configuration enables it to interact specifically with particular receptors, enzymes, or other proteins.

domain

EBM
Any of a collection of observations with a topic-specific commonality about each subject in a clinical trial, which the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) divides into different classes:
• Interventions class;
• Events class;
• Findings class.

do·main

(dō-mān')
1. Homologous unit of 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

1. Of a protein, a discrete length of the amino acid sequence that is known to be associated with a specific function.
2. Of a chromosome, a region in which supercoiling occurs independently of other domains; or a region that includes a gene of raised sensitivity to degradation by DNASE I.

domain

  1. a structurally or functionally distinct part of a PROTEIN.
  2. any of three primary groupings (‘superkingdoms’): ARCHAEA, BACTERIA or EUCARYA, into which all ORGANISMS are placed in modern CLASSIFICATIONS based on genetic structures and sequences.

domain

1. region of a protein with a characteristic tertiary structure and function; homologous domains may occur on different proteins.
2. regions of the heavy chain of immunoglobulins. See cH domain, cL domain.

transmembrane domain
for any membrane-bound protein or glycoprotein, those amino acid sequences that traverse and are present in the cell membrane. In receptor biology, transmembrane domains are distinguished from the extracellular ligand binding domains, cytoplasmic domains, and from immunological domains.

Patient discussion about domain

Q. What other illnesses are similar to asthma? I am 45 years old. My doctor suspects I might have adult asthma but there has yet been a final diagnosis made. What other problems might this be?

A. Before diagnosing someone as asthmatic, alternative possibilities should be considered. A clinician taking a history should check whether the patient is using any known bronchoconstrictors (substances that cause narrowing of the airways, e.g., certain anti-inflammatory agents or beta-blockers). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which closely resembles asthma, is correlated with more exposure to cigarette smoke, an older patient, and decreased likelihood of family history of atopy. Your physician should examine these possibilities as well before diagnosing.

More discussions about domain
References in periodicals archive ?
The field of information processing using magnetic domain walls was pioneered by Professor Russell Cowburn of Cambridge University, but at the time at Durham University and Imperial College London, just over a decade ago.
In the case of small magnetic fields, the probable reason of change for the hard axis from 60[degrees] to 90[degrees] is close related to the magnetic domain structure of the material.
20]/Ag multilayers (50) indicate that electron scattering from in-plane magnetic domains may also contribute to the effect.
By use of a phenomenon known as the Kerr magneto-optic effect, the laser beam's plane of polarization will rotate either clockwise or counterclockwise, depending upon the orientation of the magnetic domain under observation.
Each of these magnetic domains is made of a large collection of magnetised atoms, whose magnetic polarity is set by the hard disk's read/write head to represent data as either a binary one or zero.
Other topics include magnetization and magnetic moment, magnetic domains, magnetic order and critical phenomena, quantum theory of magnetism, and the magnetic evaluation of materials.
In this simplified scientific model, small magnets representing magnetic domains or atoms align along the same direction, thereby enabling the objects to be magnetic.
The boundary region between magnetic domains is called a domain wall.
Iron, like other magnetic materials, is made up of areas called magnetic domains.
Magnetic domains are nothing new in the field of data storage, but until now, accessing information from them was very inefficient.
When a magnetic field of the appropriate strength has acted on the indicator, the arrangement structure of the indicator's magnetic domains, initially visible in the form of one or three magnetic geometric figures, is disturbed that leads to irreversible blurring of the contours of these figures or to their complete disappearance.
The low coercivity probes are coated with a soft magnetic thin film, enabling the measurement of magnetic domains within soft magnetic samples.