permeability constant

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per·me·a·bil·i·ty con·stant

a measure of the ease with which an ion can cross a unit area of membrane driven by a 1.0 mol/L difference in concentration; usually expressed in centimeters per second. Compare: permeability coefficient.

per·me·a·bil·i·ty con·stant

(pĕr'mē-ă-bil'i-tē kon'stănt)
A measure of the ease with which an ion can cross a unit area of membrane driven by a 1.0 m difference in concentration; usually expressed in centimeters per second.
Compare: permeability coefficient

permeability constant

A number that indicates the ratio between the concentration gradient across a membrane and the resulting flow of solution through the membrane. Permeability constant varies with the characteristics of the membrane and those of the solute.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, the electric and magnetic constants, [[epsilon].sub.0] and [[mu].sub.0], are as follows:
and the value of inverse magnetic constant makes sense of the centrifugal force
Thus, the electric constant [[epsilon].sub.0] makes sense the linear density of the vortex tube current, and the magnetic constant [[micro].sub.0] makes sense the reciprocal value of the interaction force between two elementary charges.
A possible reason for this is the analogy proposed in the textbook [1] between the polarization of the dielectric [mathematical expression not reproducible] ([[mu].sub.0] is the magnetic constant), but the latter requires a theoretical justification.