Macropods


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Related to Macropods: Australian Kangaroo

Macropods

Derived from the Greek, macropod literally means "large footed." Macropods are marsupials belonging to the family Macropodidae, which includes kangaroos, wallabies, tree kangaroos, pademelons, and several others.
Mentioned in: Ross River Virus
References in periodicals archive ?
Plus, macropods generate less methane during digestion than ruminant herbivores.
Volume Products found a ready market for its MacroPod - an aluminium and glass case which opens up to provide a self-contained office complete with desk, chair, computer, telephone, shelving and lighting.
Numerous ethnographic accounts show that in open country, such as probably covered most of Australia when humans arrived, Aborigines often ran down the larger macropods, although they also ambushed them at waterholes whenever possible.
Djorlok was a site rich in associations with macropods, and morrdjdjanjno songs had always been sung at this place.
The excavated mounds yielded large quantities of stone artefacts and well-preserved faunal remains, including macropods, birds, reptiles, fish and shellfish.
Scientific trials are being conducted in collaboration with universities to determine the best burning regime and to reduce or prevent browsing of new growth by macropods.
Toward the end of the wet season people became more mobile, supplementing their diet with rats, snakes, crocodiles, lizards, turtles, birds, possums, macropods and fish.
There are eight goanna images (16%), five birds (10%: three emus, two heron/stork/ crane-like), four crocodiles (9%), three macropods (6%), three dugongs, two unknown designs (4%), and one each of an echidna, a fish, a bark canoe and a boat.
Macropods are frequent (Figure 3) but snakes, freshwater crocodiles and a few other species are also illustrated.
In the past 75 or so years, the art at this site has deteriorated due to the friable nature of the coarse sandstone shelter walls and damage from buffaloes and macropods rubbing their bodies against the wall (Figure 4).
Analysis of skeletal material from under nests revealed that rabbits were the most frequent prey with 76% of bone material identifiable as rabbit, followed by 12% macropods (kangaroos and wallabies) and 5% birds, with lesser proportions of other prey groups, including reptiles and fish.