Macropods


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Related to Macropods: Australian Kangaroo

Macropods

Derived from the Greek, macropod literally means "large footed." Macropods are marsupials belonging to the family Macropodidae, which includes kangaroos, wallabies, tree kangaroos, pademelons, and several others.
Mentioned in: Ross River Virus
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However, on Maria Island, intense grazing from macropods introduced in the 1960s has degraded habitats, despite the presence of Cats.
On the other hand, however, and taking the enormity of the crimes against the gentle kangaroo fully into account, the tragic and inescapable truth remains that macropods are herbivores; they are born to graze but, if overgrazing is not to occur, they are also destined to succumb eventually to their ecologically assigned predators, whose role is to keep their populations in check.
Plus, macropods generate less methane during digestion than ruminant herbivores.
In this context Mulvaney's timely contribution suggests that examples of striped- and fat-tailed macropods from the rock art of the inland and coastal Pilbara are examples of an ancient corpus of rock art and evidence for an extensive, culturally cohesive artistic tradition that existed across the Pilbara during Pleistocene as well as Holocene times.
Continuing his studies at Monash University and then the University of New South Wales, he reverted to his original love of Earth Science, and was awarded his Master of Science, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) for his investigations into macropods and their evolution.
Hosts include macropods, and the major proven vectors include the salt marsh mosquito (Aedes vigilax syn.
"We sold all the MacroPods we had on show from the stand and the level of interest was phenomenal."
There are 59 species of macropods (meaning "big feet"), the name given to kangaroos, wallabies, and rat-kangaroos.
Species identifications were confirmed and, where possible, larger species (possums, macropods, and wombat) were classified as adult or juvenile by comparison of bone fragments in the scats with reference skeletons in the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and diagrams in Green and Rainbird (1983).
Large native mammal species such as macropods, Common Wombat Vombatus ursinus and Koala Phascolarctos cinereus were recorded mostly in Berwick parklands.
Animal bone from small to large species was recovered from most spits, with the exception of spit 9, with the majority of the bone belonging to medium-large macropods. Overall faunal density is consistently small, with the exception of spit 12, in which nearly 50% of the recovered bone was found (Figure 4).