macroparasite

(redirected from Macroparasites)

mac·ro·par·a·site

(mak'rō-par'ă-sīt),
A parasite, such as a louse or an intestinal worm, that is visible to the naked eye.

macroparasite

Those parasites (e.g., helminths, arthropods) that do not multiply within their definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages (eggs and larvae), which pass to the outside. Immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load; the key epidemiologic measure is the number of parasites per host.

macroparasite

Infectious disease A parasite–eg, helminths, arthropods–which does not multiply in its definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages–eggs and larvae–which pass into the external environment; immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load. Cf Microparasite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occurrence of macroparasites in four common intertidal molluscs on the south coast of Ireland.
Interactions between macroparasites and microparasites drive infection patterns in free-ranging African buffalo.
54-66, in: Micromammals and macroparasites: How are they and how interact?
Depression of host population abundance by direct life cycle macroparasites. J.
From an applied perspective, identifying the health outcomes of coinfections involving helminth macroparasites and microparasites such as protozoa, bacteria, or viruses is of utmost importance to public and domestic animal health officials [4, 8].
(21) The quest for disembodiment by macroparasites has been a recurring, although not universal, feature of civilizations since they began.
If we put together the patterns of disease, the networks that characterize the industrialized global agrifood system, and our observations of these macroparasites, we are presented with some startling Insights.