macroparasite

(redirected from Macroparasites)

mac·ro·par·a·site

(mak'rō-par'ă-sīt),
A parasite, such as a louse or an intestinal worm, that is visible to the naked eye.

macroparasite

Those parasites (e.g., helminths, arthropods) that do not multiply within their definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages (eggs and larvae), which pass to the outside. Immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load; the key epidemiologic measure is the number of parasites per host.

macroparasite

Infectious disease A parasite–eg, helminths, arthropods–which does not multiply in its definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages–eggs and larvae–which pass into the external environment; immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load. Cf Microparasite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disease associated with macroparasites is often sublethal and difficult to detect in free-ranging wildlife.
In other cases involving macroparasites, the pathogens have been found in a number of domestic or free-ranging wildlife hosts, complicating transmission routes and links to human reservoirs (20,21).
A census of macroparasites in an intertidial bivalve community, Arcachon Bay, France.
Past researchers have used macroparasites as a measurement of an organism's fitness level without taking into account that they might be benign to the host's fitness, as well as unintentionally ignoring the effects of the microparasites that may also simultaneously inhabit the host.
And macroparasites are governments, which arose either through conquest or in reaction to the threat of conquest, until they now dominate every corner of the globe.
Her research interests are the evolutionary ecology and epidemiology of arenaviruses and macroparasites in rodents.
Pathogenic macroparasites, like tapeworms, have parasitized the world's vertebrates and invertebrates for millions of years," says Hoberg.
Macroparasites observed patterns in naturally fluctuating populations.
120 F COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF MACROPARASITES OF THE VERMILION ROCKFISH, SEBASTES MINIATUS, FROM RECREATIONAL FISHING CATCHES OF SAN QUINTIN, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO.
This report presents the results of a survey of the macroparasites of nine species of centrarchid fishes collected from three such habitats.
Although temperature data were not collected at the time sanddabs were obtained for this study, this variable can affect the development of macroparasites like parasitic copepods (Conley and Curtis 1993).
Our research to date shows that the characteristic type of immune response triggered by macroparasites has active components that can enhance tissue repair and wound healing.