macroautophagy


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macroautophagy

(mak'rō-aw-tŏf'a-jē),
A function of highly conserved genes that control the isolation of cytoplasmic constituents into autophagosomes and diverts them from the lysosomal pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are some chemical mediators that stimulate macroautophagy [73, 74]; however, no drug has yet been developed that stimulates microautophagy or chaperone-mediated autophagy.
There are at least three different types of autophagy: (i) chaperone-mediated autophagy, (ii) microautophagy, and (iii) macroautophagy. The latter is the best studied so far and it includes the formation of double-membraned organelles surrounding cytosolic material, named autophagosomes.
Involvement of macroautophagy in multiple system atrophy and protein aggregate formation in oligodendrocytes.
Macroautophagy (autophagy), strongly associated with apoptosis, is an essential cellular self-eating process highly conserved in eukaryotic organism [16, 17].
It includes macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy [16].
Biard-Piechaczyk, "Macroautophagy regulation during HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells and macrophages," Frontiers in Immunology, vol.
This process can be carried out through at least three distinguished pathways: macroautophagy (further referred to as autophagy), chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), and microautophagy.
Sun et al., "Posttranslational modification of autophagy-related proteins in macroautophagy," Autophagy, vol.
There are three types of autophagy currently described as macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA).
Kaufman, "Regulation of ER stress-induced macroautophagy by protein kinase C," Autophagy, vol.
Depending on the conformation of their polyubiquitin chains, poly-Ub proteins may be degraded either in the proteasome or by lysosomal macroautophagy [36] (termed autophagy from now on for simplicity).
Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a multistep process involving the formation of double membrane structures, the autophagosomes, which then fuse with lysosomes.