seaweed

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seaweed

(sē′wēd′)
n.
1. Any of numerous marine algae, such as a kelp, rockweed, or gulfweed.
2. A mass of such algae.

Sargassam

Chinese medicine
A genus of brown seaweed harvested from coastal waters which is a diuretic; it is used for thyroid conditions, to reduce phlegm, and for hernia-related and testicular pain. Some data suggest that sargassam may lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and have antifungal activity.

seaweed

sea plants harvested for livestock feed; claimed to be a rich source of minerals and vitamins. When fed to laying hens may discolor yolks.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides over a few decads macroalgae have become more abundant in different tropical marine ecosystems often as a response to human activities (Mejia et al.
Western Region: Macroalgae of Fernandina Island and the Western coast of Isabela Island are described as "rich, dense, and diverse" (Norris, 1978).
This points to a marked genotypic variability in heavy metal accumulation and agrees with the findings of [5] who reported that some macroalgae can concentrate heavy metals in their tissues to several times higher than those in the ambient water.
Bioprospecting for lipophilic-like components of five Phaeophyta macroalgae from the Portuguese coast.
Macroalgae take up inorganic nutrients for growth and can thus alleviate the seasonal nutrient depletion from aquaculture (Chopin et al.
Sanchez, Article: Microwave-Assisted Transesterification of Macroalgae, Energies, 5, 862 (2012).
Chemical effects of macroalgae on larval settlement of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora.
On the western side of the island, the fore-reef terrace is characterized by the dominance of octocorals, macroalgae and corals such as Dendrogyra cylindrus (Acosta & Acevedo 2006), Pontes spp.
EEI is an index used for evaluating anthropogenic impact/stress to benthic macroalgae communities.
The macroalgae were scattered throughout both river reaches.
For lotic macroalgae (sensu Sheath and Cole, 1992), recent studies have suggested that variations in the environment in small scale would represent the most important factor for their presence, and each variation would be determined by combinations of specific factors in microhabitat scale (Krupek et al.