macroeconomics

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macroeconomics

study of an economy as a whole; includes the total or aggregate level of output of an economy and prices for the economy, viewed as a whole. See also microeconomics.
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In a sense, it's surprising that such a macro-economics doesn't already exist.
This is all political accounting," he says, "but it is also macro-economics.
Garrison did mention his macro-economics course (501) which, at that time Garrison took the course, used the Ackley text.
Nonetheless, while he has eliminated many of the calculations that would normally accompany a scholarly work in this field, the book will be most accessible to readers with grounding in the principles of micro- and macro-economics and a working knowledge of current public policy research.
Liverpool University research fellow Peter Stoney,a member of Professor Patrick Minford's Liverpool Macro-economics Research Group think tank,has entered the fray by suggesting Liverpool builds its new stadium on the Mersey waterfront,close to Waterloo Warehouse.
Lucy O'Carroll, head of UK macro-economics with the Royal Bank of Scotland, - another speaker at the dinner - stressed the importance of encouraging local enterprise and investing in home-grown talent.
Not only is post-Keynesian analysis rarely mentioned, often there is little or no reference at all to Keynes' contribution to macro-economics.
But Vered Dar, the Israeli finance ministry's deputy director of macro-economics, says the fall was not intifada-related and hardly unique in the world.
Fulltext news articles, financial statements, industry analyses, equity quotes, macro-economics statistics, and market-specific information, which are derived directly from local information providers, appear both in English and in the local language.
I've only met him once but when he stopped talking macro-economics I found him twinkly-eyed, witty and charming.
If the role-reversal between the United States and Japan has more to do with old-fashioned macro-economics than with the inexorable new logic of globalization, maybe the rules of the game haven't changed as much as Friedman thinks--and maybe, also, America's winning streak is not forever.