Mace

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Mace

 [mās]
trademark for an aerosol mixture of CS, a common tear gas.

Mace

, MACE (mās),
Acronym for methylchloroform 2-chloracetophenone (the prototypical lacrimator) in a light petroleum dispersant and a pressurized propellant.

mace

[mās]
the oil-containing, red, fibrous wrapping of the nutmeg kernel. Dried and ground, it is used as an aromatic spice and flavoring. Historical medicinal uses include the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and as an analgesic; however, there are no clinical trials supporting its effectiveness. Compare Mace.

Mace

a trademark for a chemical agent that causes tearing and eye pain. The name is an abbreviation formed by letters in methylchloroform-2-chloroacetophenone, which is dispersed from a pressurized container to immobilize an attacker.
An acronym for objective measures of acute and/or adverse cardiovascular events (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, coronary arterial occlusion, death) which are used to assess the effects of various interventions (e.g., rotablation, angioplasty, stenting) or therapeutics (e.g., antiarrhythmics, statins, ACE inhibitors) on outcomes, in the context of a clinical trial.

Mace

A tear gas made from the lacrimatory agent chloracetophenone combined with a dispersant and an aerosol propellant.
References in periodicals archive ?
A pine stand built by students in the school's carpentry shop to hold the mace also needs stain.
Some of the students said they found the mace project new, creative and interesting.
2) Machine technology department head Mike Hurley talks about the ceremonial mace.
Thumbing through his thesaurus one day, Mace said, "I was going through the W's and got to the word `watch.
where Mace handed out 100 lapel buttons featuring a drawing of a raccoon and the words "I support WATCHABLE WILDLIFE.
The "watchable" phrase "permanently changed the way many people think of small animals from robins and raccoons to salamanders, frogs and butterflies," according to a history posted on the Mace Watchable Wildlife web site.
I think that really did spread the word because nowadays watchable wildlife is a growing concern," Mace said in 2005.
That's in part due to the fact that, through popular usage, the "watchable" moniker has grown beyond what Mace originally intended and now encompasses all wildlife, whether hunted or not, says Bruce Dugger, an assistant professor who currently holds the Mace Watchable Wildlife Chair in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University.
The fund will also be used for "public outreach initiatives," such as the Mace Watchable Wildlife Web site (http://fw.