multiple sleep latency test

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mul·ti·ple sleep la·ten·cy test

a test of the propensity to fall asleep, done by performing polysomnography during multiple brief opportunities to sleep.

mul·ti·ple sleep la·ten·cy test

(mŭl'ti-pĕl slēp lā'tĕn-sē test)
Sleep study that involves 15- to 20-minute nap periods every 2 hours over 8-10 hours, with polysomnography during each nap.

multiple sleep latency test

A test to diagnose any of several causes of excessive daytime sleepiness. Causes include insomnia, narcolepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea.
References in periodicals archive ?
A significant confounder for the MSLT is insufficient sleep time since many people are chronically sleep deprived (35).
W, a diagnosis of narcolepsy was unlikely due to his MSLT results.
Intriguingly, there is some discrepancy between cataplexy improvement and lack of amelioration regarding PSG parameters and EDS as measured by MSLT. Subjective evaluation of EDS by naps and its objective recording through MSLT is a further difficulty in evaluating symptom severity.
The diagnosis of narcolepsy is supported by polysomnography and later by MSLT. A dozing-off time shorter than 15 minutes, frequently shorter than 5 minutes during the test and initiation of sleep during the REM period (achievement SOREM) are diagnostic (8).
The ESS has been shown to correlate with more cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming tests such as the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) in patients with sleep apnea.
The patient was a six-year-old girl whose parents reported all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy--paroxysmal sleep, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis--but she was misdiagnosed as having atypical epilepsy (despite the absence of EEG evidence) and a variety of other diagnoses by several internists and neurologists at eight hospitals over a period of 10 months before the correct diagnosis was confirmed by conducting a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) and an overnight polysomnography (PSG).
They were assessed by two consecutive nocturnal PSG to be followed by a daytime multiple sleep latency test (MSLT).
At the clinical control, the patient had no residual daytime sleepiness; then MSLT was not performed.
Sensitivity and specificity of the multiple sleep maintenance tests, the maintenance of wakefulness tests and the Epworth sleepiness scale: failure of the MSLT as a gold standard.
Two methods used to assess the impact of sleep disorders are the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) and the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT).
On the fourth day objective sleepiness was assessed with the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and meals were provided five times to assess diet.