Chinese restaurant syndrome

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Related to MSG Allergy: monosodium glutamate

monosodium glutamate

 [mon″o-so´de-um]
a salt of glutamic acid, used as a pharmaceutic necessity, and also used to enhance the flavor of foods. See also Chinese restaurant syndrome.

Chi·nese res·tau·rant syn·drome

development of chest pain, feelings of facial pressure, and sensation of burning over variable portions of the body surface after ingestion of food containing monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) by those sensitive to this food additive.
An abrupt allergic reaction, the susceptibility to which is autosomal recessive, caused by sensitivity to monosodium glutamate (MSG), a seasoning used in Chinese restaurants and in soy sauce
Management None needed, usually self-limited; antihistamines in some patients

Chinese restaurant syndrome

Monosodium glutamate allergy, MSG allergy An abrupt allergic reaction, the susceptibility to which is AR, caused by sensitivity to monosodium glutamate–MSG, a seasoning used in Chinese restaurants and in soy sauce Clinical Abrupt onset of severe headaches, heartburn, numbness, palpitations, vertigo–especially with chronic MSG exposure, thirst, abdominal and chest pains/heartburn, sweating, and flushing. Onset 30 min after meal, lasting up to 12 h Management Nada, usually self-limited; antihistamines in some Pts. See MSG.

Chi·nese res·tau·rant syn·drome

(chī-nēz' rest'ă-rahnt sin'drōm)
Colloquial usage for development of chest pain, feelings of facial pressure, and a sensation of burning over variable portions of the body surface after ingestion of food that contains monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) by people sensitive to this food additive.

Chinese restaurant syndrome

Headache, nausea, a tight or burning sensation in the face, head and chest and sometimes dizziness and diarrhoea coming on one to two hours after a meal containing a large amount of MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE. Some critics reject this explanation.

Chinese restaurant,

a dining establishment that serves Chinese food.
Chinese restaurant syndrome - chest pain, facial pressure, and burning sensation that develops after persons sensitive to monosodium glutamate ingest this food additive. Synonym(s): Kwok quease