MMWR


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MMWR

A news bulletin published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which provides epidemiologic data: e.g., statistics on the incidence of AIDS, rabies, rubella, STDs and other communicable diseases; causes of mortality (e.g., homicide and suicide), divided by region, sex, age, race.

MMWR

Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Epidemiology A news bulletin published by the CDC, which provides epidemiologic data–eg, statistics on the incidence of AIDS, rabies, rubella, STDs and other communicable diseases, causes of mortality–eg, homicide/suicide, divided by region, sex, age, race. See Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

,

MMWR

The weekly report of illness and death rates for a variety of diseases and conditions, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Prominent in the material are statistics on communicable diseases in the states, territories, and major cities in the U.S. Articles on outbreaks of disease or accidents appear in the MMWR, sometimes including reports of importance to public health as a result of an international event.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approved viruses for the 2017-2018 season trivalent vaccines are an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1) pdm09-like virus, an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus, and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus (Victoria lineage), according to the MMWR. Quadrivalent vaccines will include those viruses, with the addition of an B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus (Yamagata lineage).
The format of MMWR in Brief allows for "rapid understanding of an issue and the most appropriate action steps for prevention and control," wrote Christine Casey, MD, MMWR serials editor, in an AJPH column.
A "suspect" case of SAPS is defined as a respiratory illness of unknown etiology with onset since 1 February 2003, and with the following criteria (MMWR 2003a): 1) measured temperature >100.4[degrees] F (>38[degrees] C); 2) one or more clinical findings of respiratory illness (for example, cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, hypoxic, or radiographic findings of either pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome); and 3) travel within ten days of onset of symptoms to an area with suspected or documented community transmission of SARS.
MMWR articles from 1982 to the present are searchable using any word or phrase that appears in the article.
After this review, if the exposed individual decided to take nevirapine as part of his or her PEP, she/he would need to be monitored closely for serious side effects, including those reported in today s MMWR, and the dose regimen should be followed as recommended by the manufacturer.
The majority of adults who received a flu shot did so in a doctor's office during the 2010-2011 season, with stores and workplaces also common vaccination locations, according to a June 17 MMWR study.
That report indicated that 2,514 people who injected drugs were diagnosed with HIV in 2000, a 5% increase over 1999 (MMWR 52[27]:634-36, 2003).
The guidelines--a collaboration of the CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America-call for assessment of risk behaviors and testing for other sexually transmitted diseases in patients with HIV and for discussing the possibility of pregnancy with female patients in an effort to reduce vertical transmission (MMWR 52[RR-12]: 1-24, 2003).
The March 3 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) indicates that four passengers became infected during that flight.
Clinical personnel such as allied health professionals, technicians, and technologists had a vaccination rate of 87.4%, and nonclinical personnel --including administrative staff or managers, food service workers, housekeeping or maintenance staff, and laundry workers--had a rate of 68.6%, the CDC said (MMWR 2014;63:805-11).
states, the rate of infants born with confirmed or probable fetal alcohol syndrome was 0.3/1,000 in Colorado and Arizona, 0.4/1,000 in New York, and 1.5/1,000 in Alaska, where the prevalence was 5.6/1,000 among Native American and Alaska Native children (MMWR 51[20]:433-35, 2002).
By mid-January, laboratories of the World Health Organization and the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System had tested 25,779 specimens, of which 5% were positive for flu; however, during the week ending January 19, the percentage of positive specimens was 13.9% (MMWR [online] www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5104a3.htm).