mite

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Related to MITES: scabies, Dust mites

mite

 [mīt]
any arthropod of the order Acarina except the ticks; they are characterized by minute size, usually transparent or semitransparent body, and other features distinguishing them from the ticks. They may be free living or parasitic on animals or plants, and may produce various irritations of the skin.
chigger mite (harvest mite) chigger.
itch mite (mange mite) Sarcoptes scabiei.

mite

(mīt),
A minute arthropod of the order Acarina, a vast assemblage of parasitic and (primarily) free-living organisms. Most are still undescribed, and only a relatively small number are of medical or veterinary importance as vectors or intermediate hosts of pathogenic agents, by directly causing dermatitis or tissue damage, or by causing blood or tissue fluid loss. The six-legged larvae of trombiculid mites, the chigger mites (Trombicula), are parasitic of humans and many mammals and birds; they are important as vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease) and other rickettsial agents. Some other important mites are Acarus hordei (barley mite), Demodex folliculorum (follicular or mange mite), Dermanyssus gallinae (red hen mite), Ornithonyssus bacoti (tropical rat mite), Ornithonyssus bursa (tropical fowl mite), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (northern fowl mite), Pyemotes tritici (straw or grain itch mite), and Sarcoptes scabiei (itch mite).
[A.S.]

mite

(mīt)
n.
Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.

mite

any member of the order Acarina, ARACHNIDS possessing clawed appendages in front of the mouth (chelicarae). They may be free-living (many thousands/m2 in soil) or parasitic.

Mite

An insect parasite belonging to the order Acarina. The organism that causes scabies is a mite.
Mentioned in: Scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
The maximum external temperature was negatively correlated with the total and effective reproductive rates of the mite in colonies producing honey and royal jelly, while the minimum external temperature was the only one negatively correlated with all parameters analyzed (Table 2).
Passay et al observed that a proportion of scabies mites remained viable up to 5 h in vitro after continuous exposure to permethrin, thus probably showing permethrin resistance in this population of mites and also got evidence by mutation analysis in these pyrethyroid resistant population, where single nucleotide polymorphism has been noticed in the genes of mites9 .
Neem oil is known to kill scabies mites, and it prevents their ability to grow and breed.
aerialis phytoseiid mites were evaluated every 24 h for seven days, with the removal of the eggs deposited by the phytoseiid and the dead prey and the prey replaced at the initial amount (Reis et al., 2003).
Mite populations, Theotis noted, have grown due to the drastic changes in temperature this year.
Analysis of variance for percent reduction in fallen mites against different chemicals at their recommended doses after different time interval is showed in Table I.
The feather mites of the Philippine eagles were found to be closely related to the mites found among several eagles of the family Circaetinae or the Serpent-eagle family.
Miller warns, "If one cat in a household has ear mites and the cats socialize with each other or share beds etc., it would be assumed that all of the cats might have the mite and should be evaluated or treated for ear mites." When adding a new cat, check his ears and have an ear swab done by your veterinarian if they are dirty.
Biological control of twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), using Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseidae) on ivy geranium: assessment of predator release ratios.
Demodex folliculitis, commonly known as eyelash mite, is a parasite that is found in the hair follicles of the face.
For blackberry, synthetic acaricide alternatives to Agri-Mek (e.g., Microthiol[R] Disperss[R] (NuFarm Australia Inc., Laverton North, Australia), M-Pede[R] (Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, Indiana), and JMS Stylet Oil[R] (JMS Flower Farms Inc., Vero Beach, Florida) were effective (> 92% mortality by 3 d after treatment) on broad mites in a laboratory leaflet dip bioassay (LeFors et al.
Conclusion: Although the results of the study show that the presence of mites in food items sold in open containers at open-air markets or stores was low, we suppose that they can cause important health problems for sensitive people.