MEDLARS


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MEDLARS

 [med´larz]
acronym for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, a computerized bibliographic system of the national library of medicine, from which the index medicus is produced.

MED·LARS

(mĕ'lărz),
Acronym for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, a computerized index system of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

MEDLARS

[med′lärs]
abbreviation for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, a computerized literature retrieval service of the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. MEDLARS contains more than 4,500,000 references to medical articles in professional journals and books published since 1966. The references are made available on request to more than 1000 hospitals, universities, government agencies, and other interested parties throughout the world by means of a network of computer terminals. The references are filed in 15 data bases, including MEDLINE, TOXLINE, CHEMLINE, RTECS, CANCERLIT, and EPILEPSYLINE. See also MEDLINE.

MEDLARS

Medical Literature & Analysis Retrieval System. The computerised bibliographic retrieval system from the 40+ databases of the Index Medicus, which providing access to biomedical literature and was managed by the National Library of Medicine in Washington, DC. MEDLARS was operational from 1964 to 1975, at which time it was replaced by MEDLARS II.

MEDLARS

MEDical Literature & Analysis Retrieval System Medical informatics The computerized bibliographic retrieval system from the 40+ databases  of Index Medicus which provides access to biomedical literature, managed by the NLM in Washington, DC. See National Library of Medicine.

MEDLARS

(medlahrz)
Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, a computerized system of databases and databanks maintained by the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

MEDLARS

(medlahrz)
Acronym for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System.

MEDLARS,

n.pr the abbreviation for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which is a computerized literature retrieval service offered by the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.

MEDLARS

acronym for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, a computerized bibliographic system of the National Library of Medicine (USA), from which the Index Medicus is produced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the more important are: improve user request statements; record recall and precision tolerances of the user; establish standard strategies for recurring search elements; abandon the distinction between "depth" and "non-depth" indexing; obtain input from the indexing and searching operations to further develop the MEDLARS vocabulary; expand the entry vocabulary and make it readily available to every indexer and searcher; extend the use of subheadings; and develop greater integration between the activities of indexing, searching, and vocabulary control.
Lancaster also recommended that NLM begin continuous quality control of MEDLARS searches to ensure good performance and collect necessary data for continued improvement.
He also refined MEDLARS indexing, expanded MeSH terminology and hierarchical tree structures, and established additional MEDLARS training programs.
Quality Control Program at NLM The quality control program established in response to the MEDLARS evaluation was described by Jenkins (1972).
Jenkins' discussion of the time-consuming process of failure analysis sheds additional insight into the painstaking and thorough nature of Lancaster's work on the MEDLARS evaluation.
In a January 1967 memo to the NLM director, the associate director for Intramural Programs wrote the following regarding early case reports from the MEDLARS evaluation:
We have begun preliminary analysis of test searches from the MEDLARS evaluation program.
Lancaster continued to work with NLM on vocabulary control, looking ahead to plans for the online environment of MEDLARS II.
Training Programs Following completion of the MEDLARS evaluation, Lancaster was named deputy chief of the Bibliographic Services Division in February 1968, then special assistant to the associate director for Library Operations in September 1968.
The critical evaluation of MEDLARS searches conducted by Mr.
We are now looking to MEDLARS II and, on the basis of this report, we should be nothing but optimistic.
Of the MEDLARS evaluation, Lancaster (Lancaster & Gillespie, 1970) discussed it as the first major evaluation of a large national information system and noted that Cleverdon (1968b) had already utilized its detailed examples for a paper on procedures for evaluating a retrieval system at various stages of development.