MADIT


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MADIT

Cardiology A clinical trial–Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial that evaluated the effects of implanted defibrillators–IDs in Pts with CAD at high risk of ventricular arrhythmia
References in periodicals archive ?
Piorkowski et al., "A prospective multicenter comparison trial of home monitoring against regular follow-up in Madit II patients: additional visits and cost impact," Computing in Cardiology, vol.
However, civil society organisations like the community of St Angadio, Kacoke Madit, continued the search for a solution to the conflict through peaceful means.
The first randomized clinical trial to demonstrate the benefit of ICD implantation as primary prevention of SCD was the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT) (5) in 1996.
reported that the all-cause mortality of patients in the MADIT II trial who received appropriate and inappropriate shocks (but not anti-tachycardia pacing [ATP]) was 4 times higher than for those without shock therapy.
The measurements have been carried out with dry friction, further with oil friction using the lubrication means type: MADIT OT-HP 32 and MADIT PP 80.
A 2002 study led by Dr Arthur Moss, professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Centre, and the MADIT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial) research group showed that an implanted defibrillator, or ICD, reduced the risk of death by 31 percent in cardiac patients.
"We were not forced to leave, we were sent on a mission and it is not completed," said, Daniel Madit, one of 15 Cuban-trained doctors now back in the south.
(46) There is a vast literature on this subject: Dennis Pain, "'The Bending of the Spears': Producing Consensus for Peace and Development in Northern Uganda" (London: International Alert and Kacoke Madit, 1997); Chris Dolan, "'Bending the Spears': Notes on Dennis Pain's report to International Alert," COPE Working Paper 31 (2001); Lucy Hovil and Joanna R.
This review of the literature is timely: the publication of both the MADIT (1996) and especially the MADIT-II (2004) trials provided overwhelming evidence for the benefit of ICDs in both primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death.
"Considering recent trial results such as MADIT II, we expect that the number of patients who receive an ICD for primary prevention will increase progressively over the next decade.
As previously reported in the Post (July/August 2002), the results of the landmark MADIT II trial provide hope for many patients with prior myocardial infarction (MI) who would otherwise become victims of sudden cardiac death (SCD), a condition that claims the lives of more than 300,000 Americans each year--with about 80 to 90 percent of those deaths caused by ventricular fibrillation.