Mycoplasma hominis

(redirected from M. hominis)

Mycoplasma

 [mi´ko-plaz″mah]
a genus of highly pleomorphic, gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria that lack cell walls, including the pleuropneumonia-like organisms and other species.
Mycoplasma ho´minis a species found associated with nongonococcal urethritis and mild pharyngitis.
Mycoplasma pneumo´niae a cause of primary atypical pneumonia; called also Eaton agent.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

My·co·plas·ma hom·i·nis

a bacterial species that is the causative agent of pelvic inflammatory disease and other genitourinary tract infections; can also cause chorioamnionitis and postpartum fever; can be an oropharyngeal commensal and has caused nosocomial wound infections.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

My·co·plas·ma hom·i·nis

(mī'kō-plaz'mă hom'i-nis)
A bacterial species that is an agent of pelvic inflammatory disease and other genitourinary tract infections; can also cause chorioamnionitis and postpartum fever.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Mycoplasma hominis

A species of Mycoplasma that can cause genital tract infections (nongonococcal urethritis).
See also: Mycoplasma
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies have suggested the occurrence of genetic variations among different M. hominis isolates with regard to their potential to invade the amniotic fluid and membranes.
In general, M. hominis is unlikely to cause systemic infection, but it does colonize the urogenital tract and can generate localized infections.
The patient was diagnosed with M. hominis septic polyarthritis in 2009 and was treated with multiple courses of antibiotics with no improvement.
urealyticum and M. hominis) can cause prostatitis and may implicated in the prostate cancer development (6,7).
urealyticum and M. hominis.Writing in the article, Robert Goldenberg, M.D., Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Drexel University College of Medicine, states, "Given the frequency of these infections and their association with SIRS and likely with BPD, it seems reasonable to determine if infants in these categories would benefit from routine culture for Ureaplasma urealyticum and/or Mycoplasma hominis and subsequent treatment with an antibiotic effective against these organisms.
64% of nonsmokers, and heavy colonization with M. hominis was present in 43% of smokers vs.
Development of a PCR-based assays for the detection of two human mollicute species, Mycoplasma penetrans and M. hominis. Mol Cell Probes 1994;8:139-48.
genitalium and Ureaplasmaparvum, reside within the same natural niche as M. hominis: the urogenital tract.
Among the women with BV, those infected with Chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomonas were nearly twice as likely to have M. hominis in their endometrium (33% vs.