Mycobacterium bovis

(redirected from M. bovis)

My·co·bac·te·ri·um bo·'vis

a bacterial species that is the primary cause of tuberculosis in cattle; transmissible to humans and other animals, causing tuberculosis.
Synonym(s): tubercle bacillus (2)

Mycobacterium bovis

A mycobacterium that causes a TB-like infection in cows; before pasteurization was common, M bovis spread to humans via contaminated milk

My·co·bac·te·ri·um bo·vis

(mī'kō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm bō'vis)
A bacterial species that is the primary cause of tuberculosis in cattle; transmissible to humans and other animals, causing tuberculosis.
Synonym(s): tubercle bacillus (2) .
References in periodicals archive ?
Among 297 M. bovis patients for whom place of birth was recorded, 214 (72.1%) were born in the United Kingdom.
The choice of appropriate clinical specimen is very important for isolation of M. bovis and M.
tuberculosis (the primary agent of TB in humans) and M. bovis - BCG (an attenuated strain of M.
This rapid genotyping method is primarily used for epidemiologic monitoring; however, spoligotyping also differentiates M. bovis from M.
M. bovis infection in humans occurs after direct contact with infected cattle, ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products or raw or undercooked meat, or (rarely) person-to-person transmission (2).
All identified contacts were tested, and 12 (0.1%) had positive skin tests for M. bovis. All cattle with positive skin tests were euthanized and autopsied.
We conducted a retrospective review of California tuberculosis (TB) registry and genotyping data to evaluate trends, analyze epidemiologic differences between adult and child case-patients with Mycobacterium bovis disease, and identify risk factors for M. bovis disease.
In 1938, the percentage of M. bovis disease among all patients with tuberculosis (TB) was 9% in Amsterdam and 11% in the rest of the Netherlands.
This case of presumed reactivation of peritoneal TB caused by M. bovis in a patient treated with infliximab highlights the need to be aware of local epidemiology with regard to transmissible infectious diseases.
Transmission of M. bovis may occur through ingestion of infected tissues or, less likely, through inhalation of aerosolized bacilli (7); typically, granulomatous lesions develop in the thoracic lymph nodes and lung after aerosol exposure, and granulomatous lesions develop in the abdominal lymph nodes after oral exposure.
data), yet few studies have been conducted on M. bovis in Iran (3-5).
A new US vaccine treatment against the highly damaging dairy and beef disease, Mycoplasma Bovis (M. Bovis), is being put through a series of UK farm trials under the supervision of north-east vet Graeme Fowlie.