M-mode echocardiography


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M-mode

A diagnostic ultrasound presentation of the temporal changes in echoes in which the depth of echo-producing interfaces is displayed along one axis with time (T) along the second axis; motion (M) of the interfaces toward and away from the transducer is displayed.
Synonym(s): TM-mode

M-mode echocardiography

A form of echocardiography based on one-dimensional (“ice-pick”) analysis of the heart in motion. M-mode echocardiography was the first application of ultrasound in cardiology and continues to be used. It provides both high spatial and temporal (time-related) resolution, and is used to measure the thickness of the ventricular walls and the volumes of the cardiac chambers. It is of greatest use in diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, intracardiac tumours, pericardial effusion, and mitral valve stenosis or prolapse.

M-mode echocardiography

Unidimensional echocardiography Cardiology Echocardiography based on one-dimensional–'ice-pick' analysis of the heart in motion; MME was the first application of ultrasound in cardiology and continues to be used

M-mode

(mōd)
A diagnostic ultrasound presentation of the temporal changes in echoes in which the depth of echo-producing interfaces is displayed along one axis with time (T) along the second axis; motion (M) of the interfaces toward and away from the transducer is displayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
In these cases, M-mode echocardiography provides much information about the real-time relationships between the chamber walls that would be missed with external fetal heart rate monitoring.
And a conclusion was reached that apical echocardiography may be more sensitive than M-mode echocardiography in detecting in specific early right heart involvement in specific cardiac conditions.
Conclusions: Early impairment in longitudinal left ventricular systolic function can be expected despite normal endocardial left ventricular function indicated by M-mode echocardiography in patients with newly diagnosed and never treated mild to moderate hypertension.
It has been suggested that assessment of the left ventricular contractile function by using standard M-mode echocardiography tends to overestimate longitudinal systolic performance in hypertensive patients (3-6).
There is no enough information about whether using physiologically more appropriate echocardiographic methods lead to different interpretations of longitudinal left ventricular systolic function than those derived from standard M-mode echocardiography in hypertensive patients.
There were no statistically significant differences between the normotensive and hypertensive subjects with respect to EF, [sub.e]FS, and [sub.m]FS calculated from M-mode echocardiography. In addition, stress-adjusted (observed/predicted) [sub.e]FS and [sub.m]FS were not statistically different in both groups (Table 2).
Therefore, we think that early longitudinal left ventricular systolic dysfunction may be determined by use of strain and strain rate analysis despite other systolic parameters obtained from standard left ventricular M-mode echocardiography remain normal in never treated hypertensive patients.
Systolic and diastolic interventricular septum diameter, LV end-diastolic diameter, LV endsystolic diameter, LV posterior wall thickness in diastole and systole, and ejection fraction were calculated by M-mode echocardiography. Pulsed Doppler method was used for blood flow measurements from cardiac valves (mitral, aortic, tricuspid and pulmonary): flow velocity during early filling (E), flow velocity during atrial contraction (A) and ejection time (ET), pre- ejection period (PEP) were measured and then E/A and PEP/ET ratios were calculated.
However, there were some contradicting properties of our case: firstly, there was no alternans in diastolic length as shown by M-mode echocardiography. Secondly, the tissue Doppler revealed no alternans in systolic wave amplitude.
A prospective study using M-mode echocardiography and Doppler echocardiography.