calcification

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calcification

 [kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the deposit of calcium salts, mostly calcium phosphate, in body tissues. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. When there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, the thyroid gland, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls. Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone and in growing teeth.
dystrophic calcification the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue, such as scar tissue or atherosclerotic plaques, without abnormalities of blood calcium.
eggshell calcification deposition of a thin layer of calcium around a thoracic lymph node, often seen in silicosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite) normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
3. A dense opacity (less dense than metal, however) on a radiographic image.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

calcification

(kăl′sə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Impregnation with calcium or calcium salts, as with calcium carbonate.
b. Hardening, as of tissue, by such impregnation.
2. A calcified substance or part.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

calcification

The deposition of calcium in tissues; the term mineralisation is often used for physiologic calcification.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

calcification

Medtalk The deposition of calcium in tissues
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite), normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
Synonym(s): calcareous infiltration.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

calcification

Deposition of calcium salts, usually calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, in body tissues, especially when there has been prolonged inflammation or injury. Calcification is normal in bones and teeth.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. Process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body hardens due to precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium, especially calcium carbonate and phosphate normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about calcification

Q. Please let me know what is breast calcification? My mom aged 52 years is diagnosed with breast cancer and is suffering for the past 5 years. I am scared too as I know that possibility of breast cancer is also linked genetically. The mammogram report shows some white spots on mammogram. But it has been recorded as breast calcifications. Doctor advised me not to worry as this has got no relevance to breast cancer. Please let me know what is breast calcification?

A. These are tiny calcium deposits in the breast tissue. You can not touch or feel breast calcifications. To know about them the only way is by mammogram. They are usually not cancerous but in some forms like tight clusters with irregular shapes can indicate breast cancer. There are two main types: microcalfications and macrocalfications. But if your doctor says that they pose no threat then I am sure you have nothing to worry about. Just follow his advices.

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