lysosome

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lysosome

 [li´so-sōm]
one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. adj., adj lysoso´mal.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm),
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

/ly·so·some/ (li´so-sōm) one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion.lysoso´mal
secondary lysosome  one that has fused with a phagosome (or pinosome), bringing hydrolases in contact with the ingested material and resulting in digestion of the material.

lysosome

(lī′sə-sōm′)
n.
A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells containing various hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestion.

ly′so·so′mal adj.

lysosome

[lī′səsōm]
Etymology: Gk, lysein + soma, body
a cytoplasmic, membrane-bound particle that contains hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestive processes. The organelles are found in most cells but are particularly prominent in leukocytes and the cells of the liver and kidney. If the hydrolytic enzymes are released into the cytoplasm, they cause self-digestion of the cell. Thus lysosomes may play an important role in certain self-destructive diseases characterized by the wasting of tissue, such as muscular dystrophy.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

One of the types of ORGANELLE found in cell cytoplasm. Lysosomes contain various hydrolytic enzymes capable of digesting large molecules (macromolecules), the products of which can then leave the lysosomes. Injury to lysosomes may release enzymes that can damage the cell.

lysosome

a cytoplasmic organelle of EUKARYOTE cells that contains hydrolytic enzymes and is thought to be produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS. The sac-like structure is surrounded by a single-layered membrane which is impermeable and resistant to the enzymes inside. Lysosomes can act as the digestive system of the cell. When the sac ruptures the enzymes are released into a food vacuole produced by PHAGOCYTOSIS, thus enabling the breakdown of ingested materials.

Lysosome

Membrane-enclosed compartment in cells, containing many hydrolytic enzymes; where large molecules and cellular components are broken down.
Mentioned in: Mucopolysaccharidoses

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

a small intracellular organelle occurring in the cytoplasm of most cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. Lysosomes are particularly prominent in certain cells such as granulocytes, in which they are the granules, and activated macrophages. They play a major role in intracellular killing of microorganisms, destruction of foreign or damaged tissues, and in embryogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given this context, our aim was to develop an assay that would allow for the simultaneous high-throughput testing of dried blood spots (DBS) for 6 of the abovementioned LSDs, ALD, and peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBD) by combining previously described methods for the measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities and lysophosphatidylcholines (7-12).
Kang JX, Bell J, Leaf A, Beard RL, Chandraratna RA (1998) Retinoic acid alters the intracellular trafficking of the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor and lysosomal enzymes.
As they pass through these organelles, lysosomal enzymes from other proteins are sorted in the trans-Golgi network (TGN).
Palekar and Magar (10) have reported that specific activities of lysosomal enzymes from tissues of leprosy patients of all types decreased significantly with a tendency to reach normal values in multibacillary patients after treatment with DDS.
Cathepsin D is an aspartic lysosomal enzyme, which plays an essential role in the degradation process of autophagy.
Many, but not all, lysosomal enzymes can be assayed using fluorogenic substrates (10-15, 35-40).
M2 PHARMA-March 31, 2014-biOasis Technologies receives notices of allowance for patent application of Therapeutic Lysosomal Enzymes from Europe and Canada
Lysosomal storage diseases are reportedly inherited metabolic disorders caused by a deficiency in lysosomal enzymes, of which approximately 50 have been described to date.
Most of these enzymes cause lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP), which can lead to release of lysosomal enzymes and necrotic cell death.
Malignancy process causes the increase in the cellular death, releasing lysosomal enzymes from the lysosomes, or causes also increase in the synthesis rate or disturb the packaging of the lysosomal enzymes in the lysosomes, thus increasing hydrolases activity in the body fluids [33].
Washington, Nov 10 (ANI): For the first time, researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have shown how developing red blood cells could be used to produce lysosomal enzymes.

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