Lysenkoism


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Lysenkoism

(lĭ-sĕng′kō-ĭz′əm)
n.
A biological doctrine championed by Trofim Lysenko that maintained that environmentally induced traits could be inherited and that rejected the principles of genetics and natural selection.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A pseudoscientific doctrine based on Lamarckism, espoused by Russian geneticist TD Lysenko, which formed the basis of Soviet genetics from 1932 to 1965
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This campaign was an offshoot of Lysenkoism and resulted in the production of numerous seeds of different nature.
The positivist-minded will see any tainting of the constitutive by the contextual as bad science; such episodes as Lysenkoism in the Soviet Union or the Nazi's dismissal of the theory of relativity as "Jewish Physics" can make this look pretty reasonable.
As Dik[ddot{o}]tter briefly notes, Marxist criticism of the class-based nature of eugenics discourse meant that discussions of genetic inheritance and birth defects were more likely to be framed by Lysenkoism in the 1950s and 1960s.
In the written version of his comments, Hirsch ridiculed "mainstream educational research," as found in "journals such as the Educational Researcher," explicitly stating, "This is a situation that is reminiscent of what happened to biology in the Soviet Union under the domination of Lysenkoism, which is a theory that bears similarities to constructivism."23
This was the period during which the Russian authoritarian genetic dogma, Lysenkoism, was imposed and prevailed in China, adversely affecting biological sciences in general, and, most severely, those engaged in agriculturally related genetic research.
Scientists initially regarded Lysenkoism as a passing fad, but the theory reigned for several decades, with disastrous consequences for the practice of science in the Soviet Union.
The less so, since the Nazi racial doctrines were pseudo-scientific, as was Stalin's rejection of biological genetics in favor of Lysenkoism. Similarly for the governmentally endorsed distortion of scientific theorizing to conform to the prevailing political ideology (e.g., "Nordic" science in Nazi Germany, and "proletarian" science in the USSR).
As to this, the claims about grain transformation were made by proponents of Lysenkoism, a pseudoscientific theory named after Soviet biologist Trofim Lysenko.
Exposure limits need to be raised to realistic levels based on actual experience, and the LNT needs to be discarded and afforded the same credibility as Lysenkoism. This would deprive would-be aggressors of a terror weapon, encourage the development of robust protective measures against real threats, free up enormous resources for worthwhile uses, and spur the development of medical treatment utilizing the beneficial effects of low-dose radiation.
This was itself an inherently comparative enterprise well aware of the burgeoning investigation of the best-known cases of ideological influences on science such as Aryan physics and Lysenkoism. (14) In other words, the study of Soviet science combined a long-standing attention to science as an international enterprise with intensive investigation of the impact of politics and ideology on knowledge.
Should that situation appear a fanciful contrivance, I point out that Caplan himself presents Lysenkoism as an irrational belief, even though under Stalin it clearly was in every Soviet geneticist's self-interest, narrowly conceived, to endorse Lysenko's theory.
It's like the Soviet Union, where you had to believe in Lysenkoism, the inheritance of acquired traits.