Lysenkoism


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Lysenkoism

(lĭ-sĕng′kō-ĭz′əm)
n.
A biological doctrine championed by Trofim Lysenko that maintained that environmentally induced traits could be inherited and that rejected the principles of genetics and natural selection.
A pseudoscientific doctrine based on Lamarckism, espoused by Russian geneticist TD Lysenko, which formed the basis of Soviet genetics from 1932 to 1965
References in periodicals archive ?
After some explanation, Hirsch continues, "I shall briefly outline the conflicts between educational Lysenkoism and mainstream science in testing, math, and early education.
The symposium marked the end, not of Lysenkoism but of the Lysenkoist monopoly in China, and the end of the ban on genetics.
Painting a nuanced picture of intellectual, economic, ideological, and political life in the Soviet Union of the 1930s and 1940s, the book demonstrates how the rhetorics of Lysenkoism and Mendelism interacted with Stalinist culture in the fight for dominating Soviet science.
As to this, the claims about grain transformation were made by proponents of Lysenkoism, a pseudoscientific theory named after Soviet biologist Trofim Lysenko.
Exposure limits need to be raised to realistic levels based on actual experience, and the LNT needs to be discarded and afforded the same credibility as Lysenkoism.
15) Others suggested that Russian-Soviet "big science" anticipated developments in other countries, found other ways to make Soviet science seem less anomalous through comparisons, or began to examine Lysenkoism itself in its international and global dimensions.
Should that situation appear a fanciful contrivance, I point out that Caplan himself presents Lysenkoism as an irrational belief, even though under Stalin it clearly was in every Soviet geneticist's self-interest, narrowly conceived, to endorse Lysenko's theory.
It's like the Soviet Union, where you had to believe in Lysenkoism, the inheritance of acquired traits.
The classic example is Lysenkoism which the Soviet government concluded was "the only truly scientific and materialistic theory of heredity constructed on the basis of dialectical materialism.
There's an element of Lysenkoism [Lysenko was Stalin's favorite biologist] all tangled up with this pseudoscience and environmentalism.
The current literary-critical superstition that everything is a construct constitutes a sophisticated Lysenkoism.
The victory of Lysenkoism in the Soviet Union during the 1940s could best be explained in "externalist" terms: it was made possible by the calamitous crisis in agriculture caused by the forced collectivation of land and by the official effort to find quick scientific ways for improving agricultural production.