lysosome

(redirected from Lyosome)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Lyosome: primary lysosome

lysosome

 [li´so-sōm]
one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. adj., adj lysoso´mal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm),
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lysosome

(lī′sə-sōm′)
n.
A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells containing various hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestion.

ly′so·so′mal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lysosome

One of the types of ORGANELLE found in cell cytoplasm. Lysosomes contain various hydrolytic enzymes capable of digesting large molecules (macromolecules), the products of which can then leave the lysosomes. Injury to lysosomes may release enzymes that can damage the cell.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lysosome

a cytoplasmic organelle of EUKARYOTE cells that contains hydrolytic enzymes and is thought to be produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS. The sac-like structure is surrounded by a single-layered membrane which is impermeable and resistant to the enzymes inside. Lysosomes can act as the digestive system of the cell. When the sac ruptures the enzymes are released into a food vacuole produced by PHAGOCYTOSIS, thus enabling the breakdown of ingested materials.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Lysosome

Membrane-enclosed compartment in cells, containing many hydrolytic enzymes; where large molecules and cellular components are broken down.
Mentioned in: Mucopolysaccharidoses
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012