Johnson

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Johnson

 [jon´son]
Dorothy E. Nursing educator and developer of the behavioral system model for nursing. Her chief interest has been in identifying the nature of service provided by nursing and in delineating the knowledge needed to provide that service.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank B., 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank C., U.S. pediatrician, 1894-1934. See: Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Harry B., U.S. dentist. See: Johnson method.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Treat Baldwin, U.S. chemist, 1875-1947. See: Wheeler-Johnson test.

Johnson, Dorothy E.

Etymology: Dorothy E. Johnson, American nurse, b. 1919 d. 1999
a nursing theorist who developed a behavioral systems model presented in Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (Riehl and Roy, eds., 1973). Johnson's theory addresses two major components: the patient and nursing. The patient is a behavioral system with seven interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem has structural and functional requirements. The structural elements include drive or goal; predisposition to act; choice, alternatives for action; and behavior. The attachment-affiliative subsystem forms the basis for all social organization. The dependency subsystem promotes helping behavior. The biological (ingestive and eliminative) and sexual subsystems have to do with social and psychological functions as well as biological considerations. The function of the achievement subsystem is to attempt to manipulate the environment. The functions of the aggressive subsystem are protection and preservation. Johnson considered that problems in nursing are caused by disturbances in the structure or functions of the subsystems or the system. Her behavioral systems theory provides a conceptual framework for nursing education, practice, and research.
References in periodicals archive ?
Senate, a southern choke hold on the bill that will rattle on seventy-seven days before Lyndon Baines Johnson, that Southern Man, stops it dead in its tracks and signs the bill into law.
Lyndon Baines Johnson was elected president of the United States.
In 1908, Lyndon Baines Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, was born near Stonewall, Texas.
Obama is no more a socialist than was Lyndon Baines Johnson, whose programs were far more radical than anything Obama has proffered.
He flew posthaste to the darkened city of New Orleans, held a flashlight to his face, and barked into a megaphone: "My name is Lyndon Baines Johnson.
Holder spoke at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum.
Then in 1965, Lyndon Baines Johnson took FDR's lead and started the Ponzi scheme of Medicare.
The full names of the presidents together with birth/death and power dates are: i) Lyndon Baines Johnson (D/1908-1973/1963-1969), ii) Franklin Delano Roosevelt (D/1882-1945/1932-1945), iii) Dwight David Eisenhower (@/1890-1969/1953/1961), iv) John Fitzgerald Kennedy (D/1917-1963/1961-1963), v) James Earl Carter (D/1924-/1977-1981), vi) Barack Hussein Obama (D/1961-/2009-), vii) William Jefferson Clinton (D/1946-/1993-2001), viii) Richard Milhous Nixon (R/1913-1995/1969-1974), ix) Gerald Rudolph Ford (R/1913-2006/1974-1977), Harry 'S' Truman (D/1884-1972/1945-1953) &, xi) Ronald Wilson Reagan (R/1911-2004/1981-1989) 6.
Woodside Lyndon Baines Johnson John Cullum Coretta Scott King Rachel Leslie James Bevel Jimoun Cole Ralph Abernathy Bryan Hicks
To borrow a reference from the recent past, he was at times like Martin Luther King, Jr, rising above rancour and at times like Lyndon Baines Johnson, challenging the nation to pass the Civil Rights Bill of 1965.
Judgment Days attempts to weave the story of two of the major actors of the advancement of civil rights in the twentieth century: the pragmatic thirty-sixth president Lyndon Baines Johnson and the charismatic civil rights leader Reverend Dr.
Kennedy, the Students for a Democratic Society, Lyndon Baines Johnson, the John Birch Society, Barry Goldwater, Ronald Reagan, and Richard Nixon.