Lynch syndrome

Lynch syndrome

(linch),
type I, familial colorectal cancer, generally occurring at an early age; type II, familial colorectal cancer occurring at an early age in conjunction with female genital cancer or cancers at other sites proximal to the bowel.

Lynch syn·drome

(linch sin'drōm)
Type I, familial colorectal cancer, generally occurring at an early age; type II, familial colorectal cancer occurring at an early age in conjunction with female genital cancer or cancers at other sites proximal to the bowel.

Lynch syndrome

(lĭnch)
An autosomal dominant predisposition to colon cancer and other solid tumors. People with Lynch I syndrome are susceptible to colon cancer alone, whereas those with Lynch II syndrome have an additional tendency to get cancers of the colon, ovaries, breasts, and/or uterus. It is also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

Lynch syndrome

Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, a strong familial tendency to this class of cancers resulting from germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Three to four percent of all colorectal cancers involve the Lynch syndrome. Affected people are liable to develop cancers at an earlier age than average—around age 45—and most show evidence of MICROSATELLITE INSTABILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
This guidance also recommends surveillance for people who have two or more close relatives, such as siblings, children or parents with pancreatic cancer or Lynch syndrome due to their inherited higher risk of the disease.
David Spencer, 31, lives in fear of the disease after learning a man he understands to be biological dad died in 2012 of Lynch Syndrome, an aggressive type of bowel cancer.
gov/condition/lynch-syndrome) Lynch syndrome , they also carry a significantly higher risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, as well as an increased risk of cancer in their ovaries, stomachs, livers, small intestines, skin and brain, among other locations.
The company said the tests detect certain proteins associated with a DNA repair mechanism called mismatch repair (MMR) and aid in differentiating between sporadic colorectal cancer and probable Lynch syndrome, a hereditary form of colorectal cancer.
The VENTANA MMR IHC Panel provides clinicians with an additional tool to perform universal tumor screening for probable Lynch syndrome as recommended by medical guidelines.
In the case of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer or Lynch Syndrome or other hereditary genetic disorder genetic counselors acquire a family and personal history for a holistic view of the family and pattern of inheritance.
Loss of nuclear expression of MLH1 and PMS2: testing for methylation of the MLH1 promoter is indicated (the presence of MLH1 methylation suggests that the tumor is sporadic and germline evaluation is probably not indicated; absence of MLH1 methylation suggests the possibility of Lynch syndrome, and sequencing and/or large deletion/duplication testing of germline MLH1 is indicated) *
The myBRCA HiRisk test screens 26 genes which may be associated with increased risk for hereditary cancer syndromes - Cowden Syndrome, Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and Lynch Syndrome.
To our knowledge, a number of genetic diseases such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease,[sup][28] Lynch syndrome,[sup][29] and familial essential tremor [sup][30] have been recognized with anticipation in the different mechanisms [sup][31],[32] including trinucleotide repeat expansion, telomeric dysfunction as well as epigenetic factors.
Lynch syndrome testing and colon cancer screening are also an important consideration in this population.
Two hereditary cancer syndromes for which public health professionals have worked to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality are hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome.