Lynch syndrome

Lynch syndrome

(linch),
type I, familial colorectal cancer, generally occurring at an early age; type II, familial colorectal cancer occurring at an early age in conjunction with female genital cancer or cancers at other sites proximal to the bowel.

Lynch syn·drome

(linch sin'drōm)
Type I, familial colorectal cancer, generally occurring at an early age; type II, familial colorectal cancer occurring at an early age in conjunction with female genital cancer or cancers at other sites proximal to the bowel.

Lynch syndrome

(lĭnch)
An autosomal dominant predisposition to colon cancer and other solid tumors. People with Lynch I syndrome are susceptible to colon cancer alone, whereas those with Lynch II syndrome have an additional tendency to get cancers of the colon, ovaries, breasts, and/or uterus. It is also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

Lynch syndrome

Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, a strong familial tendency to this class of cancers resulting from germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Three to four percent of all colorectal cancers involve the Lynch syndrome. Affected people are liable to develop cancers at an earlier age than average—around age 45—and most show evidence of MICROSATELLITE INSTABILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Release date- 02082019 - Aspirin taken daily for 2 years or more could reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in people with Lynch syndrome (LS), says NICE in new draft updated guidance.
The aim of the task is primarily to identify and provide care corresponding to current standards - families with hereditary predisposition syndromes for malignant tumors, which predominate predisposition to the development of colorectal cancer with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndrome, Peutz Jeghers (PJS, Peutza Jeghers Syndrome), juvenile polyposis syndrome (CRP) and recessive polyposis syndrome caused by mutations in the MUTYH gene, by:
The term "Lynch syndrome" was coined in 1984 to recognise his contributions in identifying the strain of hereditary colon cancer.
This constellation of cancers is called Lynch syndrome. Scientists suspect that lifestyle factors such as obesity are driving the surging rates of colorectal cancer, but Lynch syndrome patients are born high risk.
From June, health boards will need to follow NICE guidelines to test all bowel cancer patients for Lynch syndrome.
Lynch syndrome (previously referred to as hereditary nonpolypotic colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome) is the most common cause of familial CRC, accounting for up to 6% of all cases.
Women at high risk of ovarian cancer secondary to genetic predisposition (BRCA gene mutation, Lynch syndrome) still are recommended to undergo bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy after completion of child bearing or by age 40-45 years depending on the specific mutation and family history.
Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that causes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and upper gastrointestinal tract cancers among others.
Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (CRC) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of CRC and other visceral malignancies due to deleterious germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes like MLH1, MLH2, MSH6, and PMS2.
Importantly, many of the mutations identified in this study were in genes associated with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome and Lynch Syndrome.
Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by an increased risk of the early development of colorectal cancers and other extracolonic carcinomas (1,2).
Similarly, don't sweat trying to remember all the types of cancer associated with Lynch syndrome.