tarantula

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Related to Lycosa tarantula: European wolf spider

tarantula

 [tah-ran´tu-lah]
a large hairy venomous spider; although its bite is painful, it is seldom dangerous. See also spider bite.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tă-ran'chū-lă),
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; the bite, however, is usually no more harmful than a bee sting, and the creature is relatively inoffensive. See: tarantism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tarantula

(tə-răn′chə-lə)
n. pl. tarantu·las or tarantu·lae (-lē′)
1. Any of various large hairy spiders chiefly of the family Theraphosidae, capable of inflicting a bite that is painful but usually not dangerous to humans.
2. A large wolf spider (Lycosa tarentula) of southern Europe, once thought to cause tarantism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Entomology A large hairy spider, mostly of the family Theraphosidae. Their leg hair causes irritation and rashes; the bite of the Peruvian tarantula, Glyptocranium gasteracanthoides, is poisonous and may cause local ischaemia and gangrene, and evoke haematuria. See Arachnid injuries
Homeopathy A remedy prepared from tarantula parts, used for mental and physical hyperactivity, respiratory complaints, headaches, cardiovascular disease, anginal pain See Homeopathy
Vox populi Tarantulas can be kept as pets.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tarantula

Lycosa tarantula, wolf spider Entomology A popular, much maligned and relatively harmless Grade B Movie prop. See Arachnid injuries.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ta·ran·tu·la

(tăr-an'chū-lă)
A large, hairy spider, considered highly venomous and often greatly feared; in fact, however, the bite is usually no more harmful than a bee sting.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012