Lwoff

Lwoff

(lwôf), André Michel 1902-1994.
French microbiologist. He shared a 1965 Nobel Prize for the study of regulatory activity in body cells.
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Other apostome species, however, including Synophrya sp., Collinia sp., and Vampyrophrya sp., are known to penetrate crustacean gill tissues during their feeding stages and produce extensive tissue necrosis (Chatton & Lwoff 1935, Johnson & Bradbury 1976, Haefner & Spacher 1985, Capriulo & Small 1986, Ohtsuka et al.
(1) Faculte de Droit Sciences Economiques et Gestion, Universite de Bretagne Sud, Rue Andre Lwoff, 56000 Vannes, France
(35.) Francois Jacob (1920-2013), a prominent molecular biologist who received the Nobel Prize for medicine with Jacques Monod and Andre Lwoff in 1965 for his work on the transference of genetic information and the process of gene expression in bacteria and viruses, published, in 1970, his "archaeological" history of the life sciences (Jacob, LV).
He won the Nobel prize jointly with compatriots Andre Lwoff and Jacques Monod "for their discoveries concerning genetic control of enzyme and virus synthesis." His work dealt mainly with the genetic mechanisms in bacteria and he held several prestigious fellowships and received a raft of honorary degrees from around the world.
"Viruses are Viruses", Lwoff made the most famous definition of viruses in 1957 (Lwoff 1957).
He became a charter member of the International Committee on Nomenclature of Viruses (changed to the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses in 1973) as it was established by Sir Christopher Andrewes, Andre Lwoff, and Peter Wildy at the International Congress of Microbiology in Moscow in 1966.
Lwoff (1965) presents compelling arguments that information theory cannot apply to life.
10) made by Edouard Chatton (France, 1882-1947)*, Harold Kirby (California, 1900-1950; Kirby, 1944), Andre Lwoff (France, 1902-1994)[dagger], and Karl Belar (Germany, 1895-1931; Belar, 1926).