snapper

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Related to Lutjanidae: Chaetodontidae, Serranidae, Sphyraenidae

snapper

 [snap´er]
any of various carnivorous marine fish of the family Lutjanidae found in tropical waters; they are often eaten by humans but sometimes contain ciguatoxin and can cause ciguatera.

snapper

[snap′er]
any of various carnivorous marine fish of the family Lutjanidae found in tropical waters; they are often eaten by humans but sometimes contain ciguatoxin and can cause ciguatera.

snapper

References in periodicals archive ?
Day-night shifts of fishes between shallow-water biotopes of a Caribbean bay, with emphasis on the nocturnal feeding of Haemulidae and Lutjanidae.
colorado Co, Cl: Lutjanus argentiventris, Lutjanidae.
Like most of fish species in the family Lutjanidae, the Brazilian snapper is a multiple batch spawner with asynchronous oocyte development and indeterminate fecundity regulation (Bannerot et al.
Three quarters (75%) of the Serranidae, Other Osteichthyes, and Invertebrata were caught in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, while close to 50% of the Batoidea and Lutjanidae were caught in the Middle Atlantic Bight and eastern Gulf of Mexico, respectively (Table 1).
This snapper is slightly different than some of the others in the Lutjanidae family as it has an elongate, slender body that is not very deep (Moura and Lindeman, 2007).
Las familias mas representativas, de acuerdo con el numero de especies fueron: Haemulidae con nueve especies, Lutjanidae con ocho, Labridae, Scaridae y Pomacentridae con seis cada una, y Carangidae con cinco.
De ellas siete han sido halladas en peces de la familia Lutjanidae, pero ninguna en L.
Underwater visual transect census conducted in the western nearshore reef habitats (<20 m) in 2000 reported moderate to high density of large reef fishes (including larger species of Lutjanidae, Serranidae, and Scaridae), suggesting minimal fishery impact in these nearshore habitats (Miller and Gerstner, 2002) though other reports suggest that large fishes had already been greatly reduced at least in the northwest (Collette et al.