Lutembacher syndrome

Lu·tem·ba·cher syn·drome

(lū'tĕm-bahk-er),
a congenital cardiac abnormality consisting of a defect of the interatrial septum, mitral stenosis, and enlarged right atrium.

Lu·tem·ba·cher syn·drome

(lū'tem-bahk'er sin'drōm)
A congenital cardiac abnormality consisting of a defect of the interatrial septum, mitral stenosis, and enlarged right atrium.

Lutembacher syndrome

(loot′ĕm-bok″ĕr)
[René Lutembacher, Fr. physician, 1884–1968]
Atrial septal defect of the heart with mitral stenosis.

Lutembacher,

René, French cardiologist, 1884-1916.
Lutembacher syndrome - a congenital cardiac abnormality consisting of a defect of the interatrial septum, mitral stenosis, and enlarged right atrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lutembacher syndrome is characterized by a congenital ostium secundum atrial septal defect and an acquired mitral valve stenosis.
Keywords: Atrial Septal Defect, Lutembacher Syndrome, Mitral stenosis, Transthoracic Echocardiography
Lutembacher Syndrome (LS) is a rare cardiac clinical entity comprising of an unusual combination of atrial septal defect (ASD) and acquired Mitral valve stenosis (usually of the rheumatic nature).1 LS is an infrequent disorder with a prevalence of 0.001 million per population, mostly occurring in females.2,3 The clinical presentation and prognosis of the disease varies depending on a multitude of factors; the most important one being the size of the defect while other factors include severity of stenosis and compliance of the right ventricle.
Another instance of development of a right-to-left shunt is Reverse Lutembacher syndrome, in which an additional cardiac anomaly i.e.
It is absolutely imperative that Lutembacher syndrome be diagnosed correctly via transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms in order to provide adequate medical and surgical therapies.
Coexistent atrial septal defect and mitral stenosis (Lutembacher syndrome): An ideal combination for percutaneous treatment.
Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for Lutembacher syndrome: the pivotal role of echocardiography.
Cyanosis and clubbing in a patient with iatrogenic Lutembacher syndrome. Eur Heart J 1995; 16: 421-3.

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