lusus naturae

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lusus naturae

An obsolete, nonspecific term for any grossly evident congenital malformation.
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The heightened interest in lusus represented an attempt to reconcile ancient philosophies with new ways of seeing.
Doob, The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages [Ithaca and London, 1990]) in the first part of the Aeneid: the main articulations are Aeneas' errores and the lusus Troiae, but again we might underline a contribution from Callimachus' Delian poem.
El autor incluye un posible lusus iuvenum celebrado en el teatro de Singilia Barba, que constaria de simulacros de combates gladiatorios (cat.
For example, Ernst Haeckel's lavishly illustrated volumes on natural monsters, lusus naturae, sports.
In A Feast of Many Courses ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (110)) Erasmus employs the same word-play in describing a feast attended by many people of different nationalities: "The banquet you describe is surely more like a fray than a feast, in which you are likely to have the kind of farce the Hebrews say occurred in the building of Babel: when one person asks for a cold dish, another hands him a hot one" (Nae tu mihi vere conuicium narras, non conuiuium, in quo facile possit talis exoriri lusus qualem Hebraei narrant accidisse in structura Babel, vt petenti frigidum aliquis porrigat calidum).
Pomponius Mamilianus has been complaining about his duties, Pliny writes at 9.25.1, but 'lusus et ineptias nostras legis, amas, flagitas, meque ad similia condenda non mediocriter incites' ('you can read my bits of nonsense as if you had all the leisure in the world -- you even enjoy them, clamour for them, and are insistent that I produce more like them').
believes that we do not have to consider the Chrysis as the lusus of an amateur, conceived and composed to animate spare time during the Diet of Nuremberg, but rather as a work that holds a prominent position in the survey of humanistic Latin comedy, halfway between the first Latin pieces, still influenced by medieval novels and farces, and the Latin comedy of the end of the fifteenth century, inspired by philological and scenographical reflections on ancient theater.
Significantly, this occurs just as Paulo da Gama and his Indian audience are gazing at a portrait of Lusus, [66] the eponymous founder of Portugal and, tantalizingly, Bacchus' direct descendant (7.77).