lung volumes

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lung volumes

Physiology A group of air 'compartments' into which the lung may be functionally divided
Lung volumes  
Expiratory reserve capacity–ERV The maximum volume of air that can be voluntarily exhaled
Functional residual capacity (FRV) Volume left in the lungs at the end of a normal breath which is not normally part of the subdivisions
Inspiratory capacity–IC The maximum volume that can be inhaled
Inspiratory Reserve capacity–IRC The maximum volume that can be inhaled above the tidal volume
Tidal volume–VT The normal to-and-fro respiratory exchange of 500 cc; vital capacity is the maximum amount of exhalable air; after a full inspiration, which added to the residual volume, is the total lung capacity
Total lung capacity–TLC The entire volume of the lung, circa 5 liters
Vital capacity–VC The maximum volume that can be inhaled and exhaled  
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main finding of this study was that established flow-volume parameters, such as [FEV.sub.1], did not correlate with advanced measurements of lung volume, diffusing capacity, and resistance.
Changes in breathing and ventilatory muscle recruitment patterns induced by lung volume reduction surgery.
Lung volume effects on pharyngeal patency are likely to be important in OSA pathogenesis.
Variables that correlated with the increase of [P.sub.a][O.sub.2] include the decrease of peak (P=0.042) and plateau (P=0.001) airway pressure, and the increase of poorly- and well-aerated dependent (dorsal) lung volume (P = 0.016) (Figure 2).
The results further suggest that swimming practice leads to the formation of an optimized breathing pattern and can partially explain the higher lung volumes found in these athletes reported in literature.
The respiratory surface density ([RS.sub.d] ([mm.sup.-1])), the respiratory surface area ([mm.sup.2]) per lung volume unit ([mm.sup.3]), was estimated by means of line-intersection stereological method (Weibel 1970/71):
Chest X-ray findings may be confused in situations such as pulmonary hypoplasia where the decreased lung volume and density may be misinterpreted as collapse, or congenital lobar emphysema which may be mistaken for a pneumothorax.
n Playing the harmonica can help develop a strong diaphragm and deep breathing using the entire lung volume. Pulmonary specialists have noted that playing the harmonica resembles the kind of exercise used to rehabilitate COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) patients.
The endobronchial valve is used to decrease the lung volume in the condition of lung disease or more specifically emphysema.