cardiopulmonary bypass

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bypass

 [bi´pas″]
an auxiliary flow; a shunt; a surgically created pathway circumventing the normal anatomical pathway, such as in an artery or the intestine.
Bypass. Single artery bypass of an occluded right coronary artery. From Dorland's, 2000.
aortocoronary bypass coronary artery bypass.
aortofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the aorta to the femoral artery to bypass atherosclerotic occlusions in the aorta and the iliac artery.
aortoiliac bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the abdominal aorta to the femoral artery to bypass intervening atherosclerotic segments.
axillofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis or section of saphenous vein from the axillary artery to the ipsilateral femoral artery to relieve lower limb ischemia in patients in whom normal anatomic placement of a graft is contraindicated, as by abdominal infection or aortic aneurysm.
axillopopliteal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the axillary artery to the popliteal artery to relieve lower limb ischemia in patients in whom the femoral artery is unsuitable for axillofemoral bypass.
cardiopulmonary bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the aorta, usually via a pump oxygenator, avoiding both the heart and the lungs; a form of extracorporeal circulation used in heart surgery.
coronary bypass (coronary artery bypass) a section of saphenous vein or other conduit grafted between the aorta and a coronary artery distal to an obstructive lesion in the latter; called also aortocoronary bypass.
extra-anatomic bypass an arterial bypass that does not follow the normal anatomic pathway, such as an axillofemoral bypass.
extracranial/intracranial bypass anastomosis of the superficial temporal artery to the middle cerebral artery to preserve function or prevent stroke or death in patients with stenosis of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery.
femorofemoral bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis between the femoral arteries to bypass an occluded or injured iliac artery.
femoropopliteal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis from the femoral to the popliteal artery to bypass occluded segments.
gastric bypass see gastric bypass.
hepatorenal bypass insertion of a vascular prosthesis between the common hepatic artery and the renal artery, serving as a passage around an occluded segment of renal artery.
intestinal bypass (jejunoileal bypass) see intestinal bypass.
left heart bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the pulmonary veins directly to the aorta, avoiding the left atrium and the left ventricle.
partial bypass the deviation of only a portion of the blood flowing through an artery.
partial ileal bypass anastomosis of the proximal end of the transected ileum to the cecum, the bypass of the portion of the small intestine resulting in decreased intestinal absorption of and increased fecal excretion of cholesterol; sometimes used in treatment of hyperlipidemia.
right heart bypass diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricles.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·di·o·pul·mo·nar·y by·pass

diversion of the blood flow returning to the heart through a pump oxygenator (heart-lung machine) and then returning it to the arterial side of the circulation; used in operations upon the heart to maintain extracorporeal circulation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cardiopulmonary bypass

n.
A procedure to circulate and oxygenate the blood while surgery is performed on the heart. It involves the diversion of blood from the heart and lungs through a heart-lung machine and the return of oxygenated blood to the aorta.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cardiopulmonary bypass

Cardiovascular surgery A procedure in which the flow of blood to the heart is diverted to a heart-lung machine–a pump-oxygenator before returning it to the arterial circulation, used in
modern open heart surgery; aortic cannulation is used for arterial inflow; a single right atrial cannula is used for venous return to the pump; after the ascending aorta is clamped, cold potassium cardioplegia solution is infused into the aortic root, which arrests and protects the heart during the heart surgery
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

car·di·o·pul·mo·nar·y by·pass

(kahr'dē-ō-pul'mŏ-nār-ē bī'pas)
Diversion of the blood flow returning to the heart through a pump oxygenator (heart-lung machine) and then returning it to the arterial side of the circulation; used in operations on the heart to maintain extracorporeal circulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cardiopulmonary bypass

The avoidance of circulation of blood through the heart and lungs by the use of an artificial pumping device (HEART-LUNG MACHINE), so as to allow unimpeded open heart surgery or heart transplantation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cardiopulmonary bypass

Mechanically circulating the blood with a heart/lung machine that bypasses the heart and lungs.
Mentioned in: Heart Transplantation
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Worried doctors sent her straight to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London where she was put on the lung machine, called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.
In Europe, Jostra holds a market share of more than 30 per cent in the field of heart lung machines, making it the undisputed market leader.
Dean, 26, who scooped pounds 13.8million in August, handed over the money so the London Chest Hospital could buy a video-conferencing system and new heart and lung machines.
We'd still be making iron lung machines and sending them out by the carload.
The hospital district of Southwestern Finland has awarded framework contracts for supplies for heart and lung machines. The contracts, valued at a total of EUR400,000, were received by Fuchs Medical Oy, Medtronic Finland and Sorin Biomedica Oy.
He said: "All the technology, ventilators, heart lung machines are all useless without blood."