recess

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recess

 [re´ses, re-ses´]
a small, empty space or cavity.
epitympanic recess a small upper space of the middle ear, containing the head of the malleus and the body of the incus. Called also attic and epitympanum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·cess

(rē'ses), [TA]
A small hollow or indentation.
Synonym(s): recessus [TA]
[L. recessus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

re·cess

(rē'ses) [TA]
A small hollow or indentation.
Synonym(s): recessus [TA] .
[L. recessus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

re·cess

(rē'ses) [TA]
A small hollow or indentation.
[L. recessus]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Teachers, civil servants and doctors are most likely to take a short lunch break because of the pressures of work, while bankers are most likely to take a full hour.
It revealed 78% of people surveyed feel that their lunch breaks are the shortest they have ever been.
I take a lunch break mainly to get some fresh air rather than to get something to eat.'
More strangely, according to a new survey, the French, long famed for expansive lunch breaks, are also cutting corners when it comes to a mid-day snack.
LUNCH breaks are becoming a battle against the clock which British workers are losing, a new report warned yesterday.
The survey found workers today are more likely to "grab and go" rather than stop for a lunch break, with almost two billion sandwiches sold last year.
Dr Spurr said the lack of lunch breaks is a recipe for rising stress levels.
"One man said the most memorable thing he did on his lunch break was his wife.
There's a study out this week that says we don't take a long enough lunch break and bosses should encourage us to get out of the office more.
The 14-year-old, a pupil at Mortimer Comprehensive School in South Shields, was on his lunch break when the incident took place.
Most of those who skipped a decent lunch break believed they did not reach their full potential, leaving them feeling dissatisfied.