Moon

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Related to Lunar Science: NLSI

Moon

(mūn),
Henry, English surgeon, 1845-1892. See: Moon molars.

Moon

(mūn),
Robert C., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1844-1914. See: Laurence-Moon syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Drug slang noun A regional term for mescaline
Popular health noun See Full moon
Vox populi verb To display one's bared buttocks by lowering the backside of one's trousers and underpants, usually bending over. Mooning is done in the English-speaking world to express protest, scorn, disrespect, or provocation but can be done for shock value or fun.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nasa Lunar Science Institute where Ghena interned played a big part in the Curiosity Rover mission, in terms of software design, sensor integration and wind tunnel testing.
* NASA Lunar Science Institute: lunarscience.nasa.gov/
'This book is one giant step for humankind, making lunar science visible through touch and sound,' NLSI Director Yvonne Pendleton said.
He spoke about the work of the NASA Lunar Science Institute in California and the importance of hands-on space technology for the youth of the region.
'Nasa's Lunar Science Institute exists to conduct cutting-edge lunar science and train the next generation of lunar scientistsand explorers," said Greg Schmidt, institute deputy director at Ames.
There is so much left to discover there, says Greg Schmidt, deputy director of NASA's Lunar Science Institute.
The Nasa Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) will lead teams across America working on the space agency's research activities ahead of future missions.
From 1967 to 1973, the young PhD from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, who had anticipated a more earthbound career back home in Egypt, supervised lunar science planning and operations.
That is the next major goal of lunar science, but we must return to the Moon to accomplish it.
The discovery represents an exciting contribution to the rapidly changing understanding of lunar water, said Rachel Klima, a planetary geologist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., and lead author of the paper, "Remote detection of magmatic water in Bullialdus Crater on the Moon." "For many years, researchers believed that the rocks from the Moon were 'bone dry,' and that any water detected in the Apollo samples had to be contamination from Earth," said Klima, a member of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's (NLSI) Scientific and Exploration Potential of the Lunar Poles team.