Lunacy Act 1845

(redirected from Lunacy Act)

Lunacy Act 1845

A UK Parliamentary Act which, with the County Asylums Act 1845, embodied mental health legislation in England and Wales until repealed by the Lunacy Act 1890. The Act established the Commissioners in Lunacy, a group of 11 members with 3 from the legal field, 3 from the medical field and 5 honorary members.

The primary remit of the Commissioners was to inspect asylums and reach out to mentally ill patients in workhouses and gaols, mentally ill children in workhouses and single lunatics, and bring them into asylums for treatment, or, if they couldn’t be brought in, at least monitor their treatment and mental condition.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Ours is one of the few countries to still cling to the colonial-era codification of mental illness as criminal deviancy, embedded in Section 325 (attempt to commit suicide) of the Pakistan Penal Code, 1860, and the Lunacy Act, 1912.
We are taking help of the Lunacy Act and will produce the victim in court for better treatment.
In the early part of the 20th century, part of the hospital was devoted to treating shellshocked World War One soldiers, but most of the patients were 'pauper lunatics' who were detained under the Lunacy Act 1890.
Nevertheless, while Heaton briefly mentions the Lunacy Act of 1916, he fails to address the Act as amended in 1958.
For most of the last century, the mentally ill were served by the Lunacy Act of 1912, an outdated British law that used terms like"lunatic" and"asylum" to describe mental health patients and the hospitals in which they were confined and treated under court orders.
A great number of changes came in 1845 with the Lunacy Act (1845), as Parliament attempted to deal with abuses resulting from conflicts of interest.
The new Mental Health Ordinance, 2001 that superseded the Lunacy Act of 1912 has been a step forward and provides for a psychiatric assessment of survivors of suicide attempt.
The Lunacy Act was enacted in 1858 with a mandate to establish asylums.
Since policymakers and people generally had no understanding of the significance of this aspect of mental illness, Pakistan remained saddled with an obsolete law, the Lunacy Act of 1912, for 54 years after independence.
Paper read on the protection of lunatics under the Lunacy Act at Karachi.