Lunacy Act 1845

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Lunacy Act 1845

A UK Parliamentary Act which, with the County Asylums Act 1845, embodied mental health legislation in England and Wales until repealed by the Lunacy Act 1890. The Act established the Commissioners in Lunacy, a group of 11 members with 3 from the legal field, 3 from the medical field and 5 honorary members.

The primary remit of the Commissioners was to inspect asylums and reach out to mentally ill patients in workhouses and gaols, mentally ill children in workhouses and single lunatics, and bring them into asylums for treatment, or, if they couldn’t be brought in, at least monitor their treatment and mental condition.
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For most of the last century, the mentally ill were served by the Lunacy Act of 1912, an outdated British law that used terms like"lunatic" and"asylum" to describe mental health patients and the hospitals in which they were confined and treated under court orders.
A great number of changes came in 1845 with the Lunacy Act (1845), as Parliament attempted to deal with abuses resulting from conflicts of interest.
The Lunacy Act was enacted in 1858 with a mandate to establish asylums.
Paper read on the protection of lunatics under the Lunacy Act at Karachi.
York University's Professor Alan Maynard, the economist whose ideas led to GP fundholding and Nice, the body which assesses the clinical performance of drugs, is fond of saying we should use as a template the 1845 Lunacy Act.
Birkenhead woman Jean Gambell was detained in 1937 under the 1890 Lunacy Act for stealing the equivalent of 12-and-a-half pence from a doctor's surgery.
Instead of being prosecuted, she was sectioned under the 1890 Lunacy Act and committed to a mental home.
For this crime - incidentally never proven - she was committed to a mental institution in 1937 under the 1870 Lunacy Act.
Mr Taylor replies: "Under section 2 of the Lunacy Act of 1845, anyone thought to be insane could be investigated and, if found insane, a committee could be appointed to deal with an insane person's affairs.
Jean Gambell, aged just 15 in 1937, was detained under an already out-dated Victorian lunacy act.