Lugol solution


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Lugol solution

Acetic acid solution Gynecology A solution of iodine and potassium iodide in acetic acid, which colors the normal uterine cervix a homogeneous brown, seen by colposcopy. See Acetowhite lesion, Schiller test.

Lugol solution

(lu-gol′)
[Jean G. A. Lugol, Fr. physician, 1786–1851]
An antiseptic disinfectant iodine solution occasionally used to treat iodine deficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, it must be emphasized that prior to the implementation of iodized salt as observed by Weaver, et al, (32,33) this pathology of the thyroid gland was not reported in the US, even though the Lugol solution and potassium iodide was used extensively in medical practice at that time in daily amount two orders of magnitude greater than the average intake of iodide from table salt.
"Serum inorganic iodide levels following ingestion of a tablet form of Lugol solution: Evidence for an enterohepatic circulation of iodine." The Original Internist, 2004; 11(3):29-34.
Lugol solution was called then Liquor Iodi Compositus, (that is Latin for compound solution of iodine).
Prior to the availability of assays for thyroid hormones and without any test for assessing whole body sufficiency for iodine, our medical predecessors recommended a range of daily iodine intake from Lugol solution (12.5-37.5 mg) exactly within the range required for achieving whole body sufficiency for iodine.
Before the introduction of the toxic goitrogens, the thiocarbamide drugs, the Lugol solution was used extensively during the early and mid 1900s in medical practice for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and with good results.
This was the beginning of the end of inorganic, non-radioactive iodine in the form of Lugol solution, used extensively by pre-World War II US physicians for both hypo- and hyperthyroidism.
With the advent of radioiodide and goitrogens as alternatives to Lugol solution in patients with hyperthyroidism, thyroidologists became very destructive, causing hypothyroidism in 90% of these unfortunate patients.
When a tablet form of Lugol solution (Iodoral[R]) is ingested at a daily amount of 50 mg elemental iodine, whole body sufficiency is achieved in approximately three months; and the estimated amount of iodine retained in the body is approximately 1.5 g.
(39,40) The administration of Lugol solution was effective in these cases.
To be discussed later, the use of combined inorganic iodine/iodide (Lugol solution) in the right amounts resulted in better response with less complications than iodine and iodide alone.
The equivalent of two drops of Lugol solution (12.5 mg I) daily would maintain a low radioiodi ne uptake by the thyroid gland (3-4%).
The equivalent of 0.1 ml of a 5% Lugol solution, that is 12.5 mg I was chosen, a value close to the average intake of 13.8 mg consumed in Japan, (7) a country with a very low incidence of FDB; (5) slightly higher than the 9 mg amount used in Marine's original study (3) of adolescents, with a very low incidence (0.5%) of iodism following this level of I supplementation; also within the range of 10-20 mg used in the Russian study of FDB, without any side effects reported; (8) and five times less than the largest amount of 62 mg used in Ghent's studies with a 3% iodism reported.