Lyon

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Ly·on

(lī'on),
B. B. Vincent, U.S. physician, 1880-1953. See: Meltzer-Lyon test.

Ly·on

(lī'on),
Mary F., 20th-century English cytogeneticist. See: Lyon hypothesis, lyonization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Un autre trait militarisant du corpus de Dessobriga est la presence recurrente de deniers d'argent imperiaux, qu'ils proviennent d'ateliers extra-peninsulaires --RIC--[I.sup.2] 207 de Lugdunum/Calagurris pour Auguste; RIC [I.sup.2] 28-30 de Lugdunum pour Tibere-- ou peninsulaires--Caesaraugusta et Colonia Patricia pour Auguste--.
Lugdunum (Lyon's rather lumpy sounding Latin name) was the only city after Rome to enjoy the privilege of water in abundance and, in a veritable feat of the earliest technology, four towering aqueducts converged on the city, irrigating baths and fountains and making the city dwellers of old among the most squeaky clean Europe had to offer.
Since the city fathers claimed Roman ancestry, the city was known as 'Lugdunum Batavorum' and so the botanical garden was given the grand title of 'Hortus Academicus Lugduno Batavus'.
Cooper brings out the particular concerns of the Lyonnese humanists: the antiquarian interests of Du Choul reflected in the reconstructions of ancient Roman armour and dress, the gladiatorial combats and the recreation of elements of the townscape of the Roman Lugdunum (achieved by means of some rapid demolition work), most notably the triumphal arch based on the lost Temple of Honour and Virtue in Rome, and the inscriptions with their frequent Virgilian and imperial themes.
(46) Bernard, Geofroy Tory, 8: `ipsum (the manuscript for his edition of Quintilian), ut jussisti, a Parrhisiis Lugdunum misi.'
Today, Italian chef Renzo Pedrazzini puts Roman specialities on the menu of his restaurant Le Lugdunum in South West France and has published a book of Apicius's recipes.
After the fire of A.D.64, the people of Lugdunum donated HS 4,000,000 to the city of Rome (Tact Ann.
He compares the roughly contemporary, pro-Montanist epistolary description of the Lugdunum martyrs (Eus.
During the Roman era that city was known as Lugdunum, or "Lugh's fort," and Augustus Caesar installed there a provincial version of the Imperial cult of the emperor and of Rome.
So, for example, the pogrom against Christians in the city of Lugdunum (Lyons) in AD 177, highlighted the achievements of a Christian woman who would otherwise have been regarded as 'contemptible' and 'cheap' by the prevalent male values of her world: the slave woman Blandina.