Ludwig's angina


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Ludwig's angina: cellulitis, Vincent's angina

Ludwig's angina

 [lo̳d´vigz]
a severe form of cellulitis of the submaxillary space and secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental spaces, usually resulting from an infection in the mandibular molar area or a penetrating injury of the floor of the mouth. Elevation of the tongue, difficulty in eating and swallowing, edema of the glottis, fever, rapid breathing, and moderate leukocytosis are the most common symptoms.

Ludwig's angina

Cellulitis of neck, neck abscess, neck infection ENT Severe cellulitis of the neck–submaxillary, sublingual and subspaces due to infection of the oral cavity Clinical Dysphagia, glottal edema, fever, tachypnea, ↑ WBCs

Ludwig's angina

An acute spreading bacterial infection of the floor of the mouth, causing severe swelling and tenderness, with fever, pain and difficulty in opening the mouth and in swallowing. There is some danger that the swelling might extend to the voice box (LARYNX) and cause ASPHYXIA. The usual source of infection is grossly neglected teeth. Antibiotics are necessary. (Wilhelm Friedrich von Ludwig, 1790–1865, German surgeon).
References in periodicals archive ?
Ludwig's angina displaces the tongue and interferes with this mechanism.
Another concern is the use of opioids to manage the severe postoperative pain in patients with Ludwig's angina. This may lead to patient somnolence, with a reduction in the likelihood of detecting changes in voice quality or cough.
The condition we know as Ludwig's angina was mentioned in writings dating back to Hippocrates and Galen.
Our current understanding of Ludwig's angina is that it is a potentially lethal, rapidly spreading cellulitis of the sublingual and submandibular spaces.
DISCUSSION: Ludwig's angina was first described by German surgeon Karl friedrich Wilhelm von Ludwig in 1836, as rapidly progressive and frequently fatal gangrenous cellulitis and edema of soft tissues of the neck and floor of the mouth.
Endotracheal intubation may be attempted before tracheostomy in most patients with Ludwig's angina. The distorted airway anatomy, tissue immobility, and limited access to the mouth because of trismus make orotracheal intubation with rigid laryngoscope difficult.
Ludwig's angina infection in a child: a cause for concern.
Ludwig's angina in the pediatric population: report of a case and review of the literature.
Ludwig's angina required intubation or emergency tracheostomy which is lifesaving.
Ludwig's angina (sub mandibular and sub lingual spaces) was the most commonly involved space (46%).
Management of Ludwig's angina with small necks incisions: 18 years experience.
DISCUSSION: Ludwig's angina otherwise known as "angina ludovici" is rapidly progressive, potentially fulminant cellulitis involving the sublingual, submental and submandibular spaces and typically originates from an infected or recently extracted tooth, most commonly the lower second and third molars.