Ludwig's angina


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Related to Ludwig's angina: cellulitis, Vincent's angina

Ludwig's angina

 [lo̳d´vigz]
a severe form of cellulitis of the submaxillary space and secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental spaces, usually resulting from an infection in the mandibular molar area or a penetrating injury of the floor of the mouth. Elevation of the tongue, difficulty in eating and swallowing, edema of the glottis, fever, rapid breathing, and moderate leukocytosis are the most common symptoms.

Ludwig's angina

[lo̅o̅d′vigz]
Etymology: Wilhelm F. von Ludwig, German surgeon, 1790-1865; L, angina, quinsy
a severe, potentially life-threatening form of cellulitis in the region of the submandibular gland. Inflammatory edema may distort the floor of the mouth and make swallowing difficult. The glottis and tissue fascial planes may swell suddenly, causing respiratory obstruction. Hospitalization, incision, and drainage along with appropriate antibiotic therapy are the usual treatments.

Ludwig's angina

Cellulitis of neck, neck abscess, neck infection ENT Severe cellulitis of the neck–submaxillary, sublingual and subspaces due to infection of the oral cavity Clinical Dysphagia, glottal edema, fever, tachypnea, ↑ WBCs

Ludwig's angina

An acute spreading bacterial infection of the floor of the mouth, causing severe swelling and tenderness, with fever, pain and difficulty in opening the mouth and in swallowing. There is some danger that the swelling might extend to the voice box (LARYNX) and cause ASPHYXIA. The usual source of infection is grossly neglected teeth. Antibiotics are necessary. (Wilhelm Friedrich von Ludwig, 1790–1865, German surgeon).
References in periodicals archive ?
Ludwig's angina in the pediatric population: report of a case and review of the literature.
Ludwig's angina displaces the tongue and interferes with this mechanism.
Another concern is the use of opioids to manage the severe postoperative pain in patients with Ludwig's angina.
A diagnosis of Ludwig's angina was made on the basis of bilateral submandibular sialadenitis with sialolithiasis, which had caused the edema in the floor of mouth and the tongue.
The condition we know as Ludwig's angina was mentioned in writings dating back to Hippocrates and Galen.
METHODS: We examined retrospectively the medical and anesthetic records of all the patients admitted in the hospital in which surgical drainage of Ludwig's angina was done during a period of 12 months from January 2010 to December 2010.
Table 2: Diagnosis Vs Gender Diagnosis Male % Female % Ludwig's angina 35 52% 4 22% Peritonsillar abscess 8 12% 0 Parotid abscess 11 16% 6 33% Parapharyngeal abscess 3 4% 7 39% Retro Pharyngeal abscess 6 9% 1 6% Necrotizing fasciitis 4 6% 0
DISCUSSION: Ludwig's angina otherwise known as "angina ludovici" is rapidly progressive, potentially fulminant cellulitis involving the sublingual, submental and submandibular spaces and typically originates from an infected or recently extracted tooth, most commonly the lower second and third molars.