misoneism

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misoneism

(mĭ-sō-nē′ĭzm) [″ + neos, new]
Aversion to new things or new ideas; conservatism.
References in periodicals archive ?
exploring how the Luddites helped inspire the birth of Manchester's radical political history.
This incident is identified as being in 1779, rather than at the time of the Luddites in the 1810s."
A conclusion might have ventured the opinion that, given the profoundly radical-conservative nature of English discourse, always both retrospective and prospective, the Luddites exemplify a long struggle, not to abolish or transcend human limitations, but to put them effectively to work for the common benefit.
The sheer ingenuity of a project like SpaceShipOne, and its creators' willingness to face the many personal, financial and technical risks inherent in such an endeavor, run directly against the Luddite philosophy, Innovators such as Rutan consider the uncertain landscape modern technology offers them, and instead of trying to pretend that they can turn back the clock as the Luddites did--they take stock of what new things they can do, what opportunities they can take and how best to manage the risks that will result.
A number of people may object to the term Luddite being used for modern-day raisers of alarm about the future impacts of science and technology.
Students of history can look back with detachment--and amusement if they so choose--at the activities of the Luddites, a group of English fabric weavers and their supporters in the early 19th century.
Remember the Luddites? They were the 19th-century British craftsmen who, upon learning that new technology threatened to displace their textile jobs, rioted and destroyed the textile machinery.
The ambivalence of Neuromancer is what most critics have responded to, yet it is the ambivalence of The Difference Engine, where an inaugural technological moment brings issues of technological ownership and emergence and the possibilities of a Luddite political sensibility to the fore, that might have most relevance to the real world of electronic postmodernity.
The investigation is not yet complete, but there is growing evidence that only a Luddite would lay the blame on end-of-the-century technology screw-ups.
Perhaps I should say, here, that I am no Luddite. Posting government information on the Net is a great good thing - for me and mine, certainly, and all of those of us who do have access.
This positive assessment of the Luddite rebellion is based on a wide and careful reading of contemporary archival and newspaper material and provides a clear, accessible and well-written account.
Authorities say this could never happen, but still, the Luddite whale lovers believe that, in this case, ignorance is bliss.