Santería

(redirected from Lucumi)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Lucumi: Yoruba

Santería

A combination of Catholicism and ancient African magic, similar to voodoo, which is based on the worship of saints or Santeria. Believers visit Santerían spiritual healers for medical help—e.g., to cure dread diseases such as cancer. All Santerían priests and priestesses are herbalists who used plants as both remedies and for their “magic”.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on two decades of research and fieldwork, it is an impressively thorough, synthetic, and far-reaching account of the Afro-Cuban religious system variously known as La Regla de Ocha, La Regla de Ifa, La Religion Lucumi, and La Santeria.
The quantity "three" in the novel appears to represent spirituality and nature: personal lenses through which Yocandra identifies herself with the Lucumi Orisha of water and the ocean.
While she recognizes the value of nature and Lucumi spirituality, she seeks to construct her own personality from the fragments of a formerly unified nation.
Forbes said, "All travel privileges to Cuba under the auspices of Sacerdocio Lucumi Shango Eyeife and known Yoruba Cultural Association members in the United States should be thoroughly investigated.
The possibility exists that they are violating the religious rights of people, and going against the Constitution of the United States," said Jose Montoya, head of the Sacerdocio Lucumi Sahngo Eyeife, a Miami-based Santeria group.
A significant number of citizens have participated in or practice Santeria, la regla lucumi, and other syncretistic beliefs that are derived from traditional African religions and Roman Catholicism.
24) and relies on a vanguardist Miami mix of Englishes, Spanish, and Lucumi to handle the difficult continuing narratives of "who they be where / they come from" (p.
When he is welcomed by the Lucumi pantheon, he perceives animosity between Yemaya and Ochun in spite of their being sisters.
In Puebla, individuals with ethnonyms like Terranova, Carabali (Kalabari) and Lucumi (Yoruba) appear as early as 1600, thereby suggesting considerable ethnic differentation even among Puebla's small West African population.
These common themes are found in Haiti's Vodun, Cuba's Lucumi (Lukumi) and Santeria, Jamaica's Kumina (Cumina), Myalism, Pocomania (2) and Revival Zionism, Brazil's Candomble, Nago and Umbanda, Trinidad's Shango, Orisha Worship and Shouters, St.
She was a Lucumi slave on the Triunvirato sugarcane plantation, in what is now the Cuban province of Matanzas, and in 1843 she led one of the many uprisings against the terrible stigma of slavery, and she gave her life in the struggle.
Santeria (also known as Lucumi, or Regla Ocha), Brazilian Candomble, and