lucid dream

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lucid dream

A vivid dream in which a person is aware that he or she is dreaming, which can either be a
(1) wake-induced lucid dream (WILD), when he or she transitions from an awake state directly into a dream state; or a
(2) dream-induced lucid dream, when a normal dream becomes a lucid dream.

lucid dream

A dream or nightmare in which a person becomes aware that he or she is dreaming.
See also: dream
References in periodicals archive ?
For many lucid dreamers, the process can become deeply spiritual.
Instead of creating complex fantasias of flying over the Alps or slaying dragons, six experienced lucid dreamers were asked to squeeze their left hands and then their right hands repeatedly in a dream.
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, the Charite hospital in Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig availed of the ability of lucid dreamers to dream consciously for their research.
Today there are millions of lucid dreamers in the world and millions more who seek to "wake up" in their dreams.
Rebecca Turner is a lucid dreamer, writer, and Editor of World of Lucid Dreaming, a popular website on dream control which attracts 100,000+ international readers every month.
com - is run by a seasoned lucid dreamer, with ten years' experience of waking up in dreams.
The lucid dreamers usually rate higher than non-lucid dreamers in subdomains of the Lucidity and Consciousness in Dreams Scale (LuCiD) such as insight, control, thought, dissociation, and positive emotion (5).
Some persons -- so-called lucid dreamers -- can do this.
Lucid dreamers are people who are aware of their dreams and can control them to an extent.
Researchers have found that lucid dreamers have greater psychological resilience and attentional focus, as well as higher levels of activity in an area of the brain that indicates self-awareness.
But there are people, known as lucid dreamers, who can become aware of dreaming during sleep.
Judith Malamud, in "Learning to Become Fully Lucid," writes that fully lucid dreamers are aware of creating their dream, and that such awareness may also foster awareness of one's creative role in life generally.